SECRET – Minnesota Police Investigation of Officers Providing Drugs to Occupy Protesters

The following document contains files related to the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension’s investigation into allegations that law enforcement officers participating in Drug Recognition Evaluator (DRE) courses provided drugs to sober people they had picked up from Peavey Plaza in downtown Minneapolis where protesters connected with Occupy Minnesota had been located since April 2012.  The officers then used the intoxicated subjects for their training course, sometimes providing them with rewards like food or cigarettes, and then returned them to the Plaza. Though the investigation confirms many aspects of the story and a Sheriff’s Deputy admitted to the DRE course instructor that he had witnessed his partner in the course providing marijuana to subjects, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension found that there was insufficient evidence to sustain charges and obtain convictions against any of the officers involved. This was partly due to the fact that 29 former officers and employees associated with the program refused to testify, blocking the investigation. For more information on the file, see Dan Feidt’s article on the documents and watch the video report he helped produced in May 2012 which played a significant role in raising public awareness of the issue and spurring the investigation.

Minnesota Bureau of Criminal

Apprehension Drug Recognition Evaluator Investigation

  • 513 pages
  • September 2012
  • 74.43 MB

Download

The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) has investigated allegations of law enforcement officers providing controlled substances to individuals as part of a drug recognition certification program. The investigation appeared to be professional and comprehensive. We have reviewed the allegations and for the reasons identified below have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to issue felony charges in this matter.

Background

The Drug Recognition Evaluator (DRE) course provides important training to law enforcement officers in Minnesota and throughout the country. DRE train officers to accurately identify specific drug impairment and, by observation, the characteristics and behaviors of drug impaired drivers. DRE helps officers detect and apprehend drug impaired drivers who endanger the public.

During April and May of 2012 the State Patrol conducted Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) training for law enforcement officers throughout Minnesota. The course began on April 2, 2012 with two weeks of classroom training. The classroom training occurred in White Bear Lake.

The classroom training was followed by certification training, which required students to go out into the streets to find people under the influence of drugs and evaluate them. The officer students were then supposed to persuade these individuals to voluntarily accompany them to a Richfield training facility where they would provide a urine sample. This sample would then be tested to determine whether the participant was impaired as the officer had believed, and if so, what drug had been ingested. To encourage cooperation, officers never recorded participants true names.

Source of Allegations

On May2, 2012 allegations were made in the local media that DRE officers were not just seeking already “high” people to participate in testing. Allegations were that officers were providing controlled substances to sober people so that they could become “high” and then participate in testing. One individual, Forest Oliver, claimed that he had participated three times in the DRE testing and DRE officers had given him marijuana on each occasion. Some of these allegations had appeared in previous days on YouTube.

In response to these allegations, instructors asked their class whether they had engaged in such conduct or had heard of any classmates doing so. They emphasized that DRE students should not provide potential test participants with controlled substances.

No DRE officer admitted in class to knowledge of such conduct. However, after class that day on May 3, 2102, Chisago Deputy Sheriff Andrew Mahowald told head instructor State Patrol Sgt. Ricardo (Rick) Munoz that he had witnessed his DRE partner, Hutchinson Officer Karl Willers, provide marijuana to test subjects. Mahowald coming forward with this information ultimately led to Hutchinson Police Chief Hatten requesting a BCA investigation of allegations regarding Hutchinson officers.

Unveiled – NYPD Occupy Wall Street May Day Advisory Bulletin

https://publicintelligence.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/NYPD-OWS-MayDay.png

 

 

Occupy Wall Street (OWS) protesters are calling for a “General Strike” on Tuesday, May 1, urging workers not to go to work and students to boycott classes in protest of what organizers characterize as society’s economic inequality. No unions are expected to participate in the strike, and some have talked to reporters about the fact that they weren’t consulted in OWS’s decision to announce a General Strike. Nonetheless, some elements of organized labor are expected to participate in their own customary May Day rally (which has occurred since 2004), marching from Union Square to Foley Square to Bowling Green, with speeches at either end beginning at about 4:00pm and ending by 7:00pm. The union organizers involved in that march have sought a permit for it. Details are being worked out.

The “General Strike” was initially proposed by the Los Angeles node of OWS in November 2011, endorsed by Occupy Oakland at the end of January 2012, and subsequently endorsed by the OWS New York General Assembly on
February 14.

There are fissures within OWS, but a “respect for diversity of tactics,” which includes everything from peaceful protests to the kind of vandalism directed at Starbucks in April, when demonstrators tried to smash the windows at the Starbucks location at Astor Place, has been embraced by the movement.

Below is a list of events that are scheduled to be held on May 1. Although the list is comprehensive, various OWS postings have called for autonomous actions, splinter demonstrations, and flash mobs.

Event Assessment

The General Strike is the first of several major global demonstrations that the OWS movement has played a role in planning, including demonstrations scheduled for May 12, May 15, and May 17-21.3 As such, it should be expected that organizers have emphasized the importance of turnout and will be seeking maximum media coverage.

Political fissures that are present within the OWS movement may impact the strategies of demonstrators during individual protest actions; in particular, the Wildcat March is not an officially sanctioned OWS march and may attract militant elements from inside and outside the OWS movement that may seek to directly confront law enforcement officials using barricades, riot shields, and possibly weapons such as pipes and rocks.

Although OWS organizers have publicized a large number of the marches, demonstrations, and activities that will take place throughout the day, it should be expected that “pop-up” demonstrations, splinter demonstrations, and flash mobs may occur at any time, especially during “evening actions” that are planned for 7:00pm and later.

In their planning, the OWS NYCGA has endorsed solidarity based on a “respect for a diversity of tactics,” which suggests that autonomous actions of demonstrators using Black Bloc tactics may occur at any time.

Crpytome unveils – OWS Protestors Get 1A Camp at National Memorial

Notice of Temporary Change

Federal Hall National Memorial is announcing a temporary change to how the public will access the building. Taking this action affords visitors safe access to the site without interfering with those participating in 1st amendment activities at the site.

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17 April 2012

Occupy Wall Street 17 April 2012

The steps of Federal Hall National Memorial have replaced the sidewalks for the Occupy Wall Street
encampment. Located across Wall Street from the New York Stock Exchange, it is one of the most
popular tourist stops in NYC.

The protest is described by OWS as training for a worldwide General Strike on 1 May 2012. More:

Tidalhttp://occupytheory.org

http://occupiedmedia.us

Cryptome Protest Series: http://cryptome.org/protest-series.htm

 


 

Occupy Wall Street 17 April 2012

[Image]Members of Occupy Wall Street gather on the steps of Federal Hall after being evicted from the sidewalk early yesterday morning where they had been sleeping on April 17, 2012 in New York City. April 17, 2012. Cryptome

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US National Park Service (USNPS) police, which guard national Memorials such as the Statue of Liberty,
are monitoring the protest along with NYPD. An attempt by USNPS police to move the protestors to one
side of the steps was resisted by the protestor above while Cryptome photos and a video were made.
In answer to an inquiry about the resistance, the USNPS officer answered every question with
“they are exercising free speech.”

[Image]Members of Occupy Wall Street gather on the steps of Federal Hall after being evicted from the sidewalk early yesterday morning where they had been sleeping on April 17, 2012 in New York City. As temperatures warm, members of the global protest movement have reasserted their commitment to finding a permanent presence in the financial district following their eviction from Zucotti Park last November in a dramatic police raid. Getty
[Image]Members of Occupy Wall Street gather on the steps of Federal Hall after being evicted from the sidewalk early yesterday morning where they had been sleeping on April 17, 2012 in New York City. As temperatures warm, members of the global protest movement have reasserted their commitment to finding a permanent presence in the financial district following their eviction from Zucotti Park last November in a dramatic police raid. Getty
[Image]Members of Occupy Wall Street gather on the steps of Federal Hall after being evicted from the sidewalk early yesterday morning where they had been sleeping on April 17, 2012 in New York City. As temperatures warm, members of the global protest movement have reasserted their commitment to finding a permanent presence in the financial district following their eviction from Zucotti Park last November in a dramatic police raid. Getty
Following photos taken by Cryptome between 11:30 and 13:30, 17 April 2012.
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]US National Park Service police SWAT members. Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome

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Senior Park Service police overheard discussing how to corral the protestors without provoking resistance. 17 April 2012. Cryptome

[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
 

Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome

[Image]Side wall of Federal Hall National Memorial where OWS protestors slept overnight until evicted by NYPD. 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Sidewalk across from Federal Hall National Memorial where OWS protestors slept overnight until evicted by NYPD. 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]Occupy Wall Street, Federal Hall National Memorial, 17 April 2012. Cryptome
[Image]School children were led in a protest chant by their teacher.

 


	

Uncensored – Occupy Wall Street 13 April 2012

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protestors are taking up the movement in Manhattan again, sleeping on sidewalks around the New York Stock Exchange. Eric Michael Johnson for The New York Times

Occupy Wall Street 13 April 2012

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protestors are arrested by New York City police officers during a demonstration across the street from the New York Stock Exchange on April 13, 2012 in New York City. In preparation for massive May Day demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street protestors continue to hold weekly ‘Spring Training’ demonstrations. Getty

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[Image]Occupy Wall Street protestors stage a demonstration across the street from the New York Stock Exchange on April 13, 2012 in New York City. In preparation for massive May Day demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street protestors continue to hold weekly ‘Spring Training’ demonstrations. Getty
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor holds a sign during a demonstration on April 13, 2012 in New York City. In preparation for massive May Day demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street protestors continue to hold weekly ‘Spring Training’ demonstrations. Getty
[Image]New York City police officers monitor an Occupy Wall Street protest on April 13, 2012 in New York City. In preparation for massive May Day demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street protestors continue to hold weekly ‘Spring Training’ demonstrations. Getty
[Image]Members of the Occupy Wall Street hold a protest rally in the financial district in New York April 13, 2012. Reuters
[Image]New York City police officers stand guard in front of the New York Stock Exchange during an Occupy Wall Street protest on April 13, 2012 in New York City. In preparation for massive May Day demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street protestors continue to hold weekly ‘Spring Training’ demonstrations. Getty
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters chant during a demonstration at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange in the Financial District in New York April 13, 2012. Reuters
[Image]Members of the Occupy Wall Street movement hold a banner along Wall Street after spending the night sleeping across the street from the New York Stock Exchange April 13, 2012. Reuters
[Image]Members of the Occupy Wall Street wake up from a night of sleeping on the street in front of the New York Stock Exchange in New York April 13, 2012. Reuters
[Image]A member of the Occupy Wall Street movement yawns after waking up from a night of sleeping on the street in front of the New York Stock Exchange in New York April 13, 2012. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters sleeps at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
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[Image]Occupy Wall Street protester Yoni Miller (R) hands out flyers to people at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]A police officer inspects Occupy Wall Street protesters sleeping at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters read a book on the steps of Federal Hall, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner Wall Street and Nassau Street, near the stock exchange, for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters chant during a demonstration at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protester Brandon Crozier holds up a sign at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]A woman walks past sleeping Occupy Wall Street protesters, at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]A man walks past Occupy Wall Street protesters at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protestors have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protester Ray Leone (C) holds up a sign at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters

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[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters hold up signs at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street, across the street from the New York Stock Exchange, in the Financial District in New York April 12, 2012. Occupy Wall Street protesters have slept at the corner for the past three nights. Reuters
[Image]Occupy Wall Street participants occupy a sidewalk near the New York Stock Exchange, background right, Thursday, April 12, 2012. (Richard Drew)

New York Times, April 13, 2012:

For the third consecutive night, Occupy Wall Street protesters used a tactic that many of them hope will emerge as a replacement for their encampment at Zuccotti Park, which was disbanded by the police in November. Norman Siegel, a prominent civil-rights lawyer who visited the protesters on Wednesday night, said a decision by a federal court in Manhattan arising from a lawsuit in 2000 allowed the protesters to sleep on sidewalks as a form of political expression so long as they did not block doorways and took up no more than half the sidewalk.The protesters first cited that ruling last week while sleeping outside bank branches near Union Square, but said this week that they wanted so-called sleep-outs to occur nightly around the New York Stock Exchange. An organizer, Austin Guest, said protesters had scheduled such events for Friday night at four other spots, each related to the Occupy Wall Street message that the financial system benefits the rich and corporations at the expense of ordinary citizens. The protesters’ presence on and near Wall Street has drawn the attention of the police, but officers have not dislodged them.

UNCENSORED – Belarus Protest Photos

[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen detain protesters during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen detain a protester during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen detain protesters during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko.[Image]
[Image]Detained protesters show V-signs as they sit in a police van during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]A detained protester showsa V-sign as he sits in a police van during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen detain a protester during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen detain a protester during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]A Belarus plainclothes policeman, left, detains protesters during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]A woman protects her husband from a plainclothes policeman, left, during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]A woman argues with plainclothes policemen as they push back protesters during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Belarus plainclothes policemen push back protesters during an action “Revolution via social network” in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Police in Belarus have violently quashed a peaceful anti-government rally, detaining dozens of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Sergei Grits)
[Image]Youths applaud as they participate in a peaceful rally to protest the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko, Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Belarusian police violently dispersed a peaceful rally Wednesday by thousands of people protesting the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko and the country’s worst financial crisis since the fall of the Soviet Union two decades ago. (Sergei Grits)

Revealed – SOPA Blackout JS Utility

Earlier this week, Reddit.com announced that they would be blacking out their site on January 18th. Likewise, many of us should take similar action versus this bill. The damage it would cause to our internet infrastructure would be irreparable. What we propose is a simple, but effective message for any webmasters to use on their site on this date.

How to use

The following will present a blackout banner when users visit your site, which can be circumvented by clicking anywhere:

<script type=”text/javascript” src=”//js.sopablackout.org/sopablackout.js”></script>

The following will blackout an element of a specific id:

<script type=”text/javascript”>sopablackout_id = ‘sopa’;</script>
<script type=”text/javascript” src=”//js.sopablackout.org/sopablackout.js”></script>

WordPress Plugin

Sasha Gerrand kindly created a wordpress plugin to easily implement this. Check it out on github.

Created by @sirpengi and Jacob Miller

 

What is SOPA?

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA, H.R. 3261) is on the surface a bill that attempts to curb online piracy. Sadly, the proposed way it goes about doing this would devastate the online economy and the overall freedom of the web. It would particularly affect sites with heavy user generated content. Sites like Youtube, Reddit, Twitter, and others may cease to exist in their current form if this bill is passed.

What is PIPA?

The Protect IP Act (PIPA, S. 968) is SOPA’s twin in the Senate. Under current DMCA law, if a user uploads a copyrighted movie to sites like Youtube, the site isn’t held accountable so long as they provide a way to report user infringement. The user who uploaded the movie is held accountable for their actions, not the site. PIPA would change that – it would place the blame on the site itself, and would also provide a way for copyright holders to seize the site’s domain in extreme circumstances.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation laid out four excellent points as to why the bills are not only dangerous, but are also not effective for what they are trying to accomplish:

  • The blacklist bills are expensive. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that PIPA alone would cost the taxpayers at least $47 million over 5 years, and could cost the private sector many times more. Those costs would be carried mostly by the tech industry, hampering growth and innovation.
  • The blacklist bills silence legitimate speech. Rightsholders, ISPs, or the government could shut down sites with accusations of infringement, and without real due process.
  • The blacklist bills are bad for the architecture of the Internet. But don’t take our word for it: see the open letters that dozens of the Internet’s concerned creators have submitted to Congress about the impact the bills would have on the security of the web.
  • The blacklist bills won’t stop online piracy. The tools these bills would grant rightsholders are like chainsaws in an operating room: they do a lot of damage, and they aren’t very effective in the first place. The filtering methods might dissuade casual users, but they would be trivial for dedicated and technically savvy users to circumvent.

UNCENSORED -Occupy Wall Street Photos 10 January 2012

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters read books in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in Zuccotti Park as security guards stand next to stacks of barricades,Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012, in New York. The barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters make signs in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park Tuesday, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Police officers guard the perimeter of Zuccotti Park As Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in the park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, Tuesday, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Security from Brookfield Properties, the owners of Zuccotti Park, watch as Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in the park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by the owners allowing access into the park by the protesters on Tuesday. (Louis Lanzano)

Uncensored – Occupy Wall Street Photos 10 January 2012 – Courtesy of Cryptome

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters read books in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in Zuccotti Park as security guards stand next to stacks of barricades,Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012, in New York. The barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters make signs in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park Tuesday, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Police officers guard the perimeter of Zuccotti Park As Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in the park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, Tuesday, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by Brookfield Properties, the owners of the park, allowing access once again into the park by the protesters. (Louis Lanzano)
[Image]Security from Brookfield Properties, the owners of Zuccotti Park, watch as Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in the park, Tuesday, Jan.10, 2012, in New York. Barricades were removed by the owners allowing access into the park by the protesters on Tuesday. (Louis Lanzano)

NEWS – New York Police Circulating Mysterious Government Guide to Criminal Tactics of “Protest Extremists”

https://i1.wp.com/publicintelligence.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/protesting-is-not-a-crime.png

An image from the first page of a manual on criminal tactics of “protest extremists” shows a legal, First Amendment-protected event occurring on the National Mall. The guide then lists a number of issues and beliefs such as “environment” and “peace” which can provide an agenda for protest actions.

An email contained in the latest AntiSec release indicates that law enforcement agencies in New York have been circulating an out-of-date manual that was previously criticized by the ACLU to instruct officers about issues related to Occupy protests.  The brief email from December 5, 2011 was circulated to a number of law enforcement agencies affiliated with the Mid Hudson Chiefs of Police Association and contains several document attachments that describe tactics used by protesters, including basic guides on how to conduct your own “Occupy” protest.  One of the documents is a police manual titled “Civil Disturbance and Criminal Tactics of Protest Extremists” that describes “illegal” tactics used by protesters and so-called “protest extremists”.  The document, which was last revised in 2003, does not list its originating agency or author and is marked with a number of unusual protective markings indicating that it is not intended for public release.

The existence of the document was first discussed in a 2003 article from the Colorado Springs Independent which quoted a representative of the local FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force discussing the manual:

In a written statement recently obtained by the Colorado ACLU, an agent of the Denver Joint Terrorism Task Force describes how he has used the manual to instruct local law-enforcement officers.”Beginning in 2001, I began using a training manual created by the U.S. government, which identifies civil disturbance and criminal protest tactics and instructs on how to respond to those tactics,” states the agent, Tom Fisher. The manual, he states, is “part of a program offered by the United States government on criminal protest tactics.”

According to the statement, the training manual is “law-enforcement sensitive” and not to be released to the public.

Fisher also states that he has been teaching the Denver Police Department about “terrorist issues,” including “criminal tactics of protest extremists.”

The manual contained in the latest AntiSec release is further confirmed to be this document by a spokesman for the Colorado Springs Police Department who quotes from the document and refers to it by name:

A spokesman for the Colorado Springs Police Department said he’s not sure whether the department received the Oct. 15 FBI memo. “We have no record of receiving that intelligence bulletin, although that’s not to say we didn’t,” said the spokesman, Lt. Skip Arms.Springs police have not received training from Fisher, though they do use a manual titled Civil Disturbance and Criminal Tactics of Protest Extremists, Arms said.

“It’s something that our tactical people would look at and compare to their tactics,” he said.

Arms said he doesn’t know where the department obtained the manual or who authored it. The introduction states that it is “the result of an extensive interagency collaboration to address a surge of protest activity worldwide,” but nothing in it indicates specifically that it was developed by the U.S. government, he said.

Lt. Arms quotes from the introduction which states “‘Civil Disturbance and Criminal Tactics of Protest Extremists’, was prepared in response to the increase of protest activity worldwide and the escalation of violence and property destruction that has occurred in the past several years. Information regarding the unlawful operational and tactical activities was collected and interpreted by multiple agencies. The information presented is for law enforcement and public safety officials to assist in effectively managing civil disturbances and large-scale protests”.

Policing First Amendment-Protected Events

Whether you are sympathetic to the complaints of Occupy protesters or not, the nationwide and now global movement to occupy civic spaces has had a much more tangible and immediate impact: demonstrating the increasing militaristic tactics of police around the country to suppress constitutionally-protected speech and dissent.  Though law enforcement is presented with a unique set of challenges in response to the Occupy protests, which include balancing reasonable protection of public safety while ensuring that citizens’ right to express themselves is honored, the tactics of law enforcement agencies around the country have helped to demonstrate the repressive nature of modern policing in the United States.

Throughout the country, predominantly peaceful gatherings in public spaces have been met with midnight raids conducted by black-clad phalanxes of often unidentifiable police, rousting them from their tents, tarps and other minimalistic structures to either arrest them or forcibly remove them from the space.  These raids have been coordinated at the national level, resulting in thousands of arrests that are sometimes without legal justification.  In many of these law enforcement actions, videos have later emerged showing police violating a number of core principles of policing First Amendment-protected events, including firing less-lethal munitions without provocation, indiscriminately beating protesters, storming protest encampments with live ammunition, ignoring or confiscating press credentials and arresting credentialed journalists.  Many of the actions taken by police are in violation of the Department of Justice guidelines for policing First Amendment-protected events and are often in contravention of the police department’s own internal policies.

According to the recently released Department of Justice guidelines for law enforcement responses to First Amendment-protected events, the role of law enforcement officers is to “ensure the safety of the general public” while protecting the “rights of persons practicing their First Amendment right to assemble peacefully.”  The manual states that police are not allowed to collect information on the event, its organizers or its beliefs without a clear “criminal predicate” necessitating a public safety response.  Though the boundaries of criminal behavior become murky when First Amendment-protected activities are involved, the guidelines make it clear that “membership or participation in a group or organization that has engaged in illegal activities in the past with respect to protests or demonstrations does not alone establish reasonable, articulable suspicion of criminal activity with respect to each of its members.”  Acts that are considered to be part of “symbolic speech” such as flag burning are considered to be protected under the First Amendment.  A New York judge’s November decision to uphold eviction of Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park mentioned that the protests were successful “largely because of the unorthodox tactic of occupying the subject public space on a 24-hour basis, and constructing an encampment there” admitting that the action of non-violently occupying a public space was, for the protesters, a form expression that would arguably be protected under the First Amendment.

The Department of Justice guidelines state that “persons or groups communicating with each other or members of the public in any form in pursuit of social or political causes” do not alone provide justification for police investigation.  The rights of individuals and groups under the First Amendment may only be limited when the event in question interferes with other people’s constitutional rights or creates a hazard for public health or safety.  However, even in cases where public health and safety is an issue, police are required to work with protesters to mitigate the risks to the public without suppressing their legitimate right to protest.  The 2003 guide to “Criminal Tactics of Protest Extremists” violates many of the rules set forth in the Department of Justice’s guidelines by repeatedly blurring the lines between criminal activity, such as property destruction, and lawful forms of protected speech, such as banner hanging.  The 2003 guide also discusses the ideological beliefs of protesters and how they provide an agenda for protest actions, something expressly prohibited by the Constitution and the Department of Justice guidelines. Basic descriptions of protester tactics in the 2003 guide, including communications patterns and organizing activities, are also in violation of Federal guidelines as they concern actions that are not only inherently lawful, but are legally protected under the First Amendment.

Exposed and Uncensored – Nudity Protests

Nudity Protests

[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** Brazilian carnival queen Viviane Castro parades with an image depicting President Barack Obama painted on her left leg during carnival celebrations in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, Feb. 21, 2009. Castro’s stomach reads in Portuguese “for sale,” a message she said represented the sale of Brazil’s Amazon to the U.S. (Folha Imagem, Lalo de Almeida)
[Image](EDITORS NOTE: Image contains nudity. The indignants have come from across the country to protest high levels of unemployment, the austerity measures and what they consider a stagnant and corrupt political system. Getty

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[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A model walks her bicycle during a protest against worldwide pollution in Bogota, Wednesday, April 1, 2009. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]EDS NOTE NUDITY – South Korean prostitutes in their underwear and covered in body and face paint, and some others wearing mourning clothes, rush to police line after a rally in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Hundreds of prostitutes and pimps rallied Tuesday near a red-light district in Seoul to protest a police crackdown on brothels, with some unsuccessfully attempting to set themselves on fire. AP
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A woman holds up her bike during the World Naked Bike Ride in Sao Paulo, Saturday, June 14, 2008. Although total nudity is prohibited in public areas in Brazil, the woman was not detained. Of about 200 bikers, police detained only one man after he denied to wear his clothes. (Andre Penner)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A policemen kicks a man during the World Naked Bike Ride in Sao Paulo, Saturday, June 14, 2008.(Andre Penner)
[Image](EDITORS NOTE: THIS IMAGE CONTAINS PARTIAL NUDITY) Protesters perfom during demonstrations against the influence of bankers and financiers in front of the Reichstagsgebaeude on October 15, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. Thousands of people took to the streets today in cities across Germany in demonstrations inspired by the Occupy Wall Street protests in the United States. Activists are demanding an end to the free-wheeling ways of global financial players whom they see as responsible for the current European and American economic woes.

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[Image]AUGUST 13: (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains nudity. Several thousand men and women turned out to protest against rape and a woman’s right to her body.
[Image]EDS NOTE NUDITY Semi naked activists from the Ukrainian female rights group Femen protest in front of the Saudi Arabian embassy against a ban on driving cars for women in Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, June 16, 2011. (Sergei Chuzavkov)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A nude demonstrator gestures towards the police in Malmo, Sweden, Friday Sept. 19, 2008. A street occupation by activists on the fringes of the European Social Forum turned into stone throwing and fighting. (Drago Prvulovic)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A protester performs during a march to mark the 1968 Tlatelolco plaza “massacre”‘ in Mexico City, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2008. Hundreds of student demonstrators were killed by men with guns and soldiers on October 2, 1968, ten days before the 1968 Summer Olympics celebrations in Mexico City. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** Employees of LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics lead a protest outside of the LUSH Walnut Street shop, wearing nothing but aprons to urge shoppers to buy products that are free of packaging, in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2008. (Justin Maxon)
[Image]** EDS NOTE: NUDITY ** Animal rights activist wearing banderillas, barbed darts which are stabbed into the bull’s neck during bullfights, are seen during a protest prior to start the nine day San Fermin Festival on Sunday in Pamplona northern Spain, Saturday, July 5, 2008. (Alvaro Barrientos)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** A policeman sprays pepper gas as he detains a man during the World Naked Bike Ride in Sao Paulo, Saturday, June 14, 2008.(Andre Penner)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** Two models wearing gas masks ride bicycles during a protest against worldwide pollution as a man takes their picture in Bogota, Wednesday, April 1, 2009. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** Five models wearing gas masks pose for a photo as they protest worldwide pollution in Bogota, Wednesday, April 1, 2009. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]**EDS NOTE NUDITY** A group of women with their bodies painted march during the International Day of the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Bogota, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2009. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]**EDS NOTE NUDITY** Women with painted bodies perform during a march against violence against women in San Salvador, Wednesday , Nov. 25 , 2009. Hundreds of people marched Wednesday in honor of International Day for Elimination of Violence against Women. (Luis Romero)
[Image]EDS NOTE NUDITY – Women protest against the high cost of living during a rally marking May Day in the streets of San Salvador, El Salvador, Sunday May 1, 2011. Activists filled the streets marking International Workers’ Day with skits and marchers that brought attention to the rising cost of living and growing disparities between the rich and poor. AP
[Image]EDS NOTE NUDITY – Students, one with her body painted, march to protest a government law project to increase private investments in public universities in Medellin, Colombia, Thursday, April 7, 2011.

Nudity Celebration

[Image]** EDS NOTE NUDITY ** Dancers perform on a Vila Isabel samba school float at the Sambodrome in Rio de Janeiro, Monday, Feb. 23, 2009. (Natacha Pisarenko)
[Image]**EDS NOTE NUDITY** A dancer performs during the parade of the Gavioes da Fiel samba school in Sao Paulo, Sunday, Feb. 22, 2009. (Andre Penner)

UNCENSORED – Occupy Wall Street NYC Photos

Liberty Park is encircled with tied-together barricades, with only two points of entry to the park, one each along Liberty and Cedar Streets.[Image]
Green-vested “guards” are numerous. These outnumber the few police outside the park.
Some of the guards appear to be undercover cops, perhaps all of them.[Image]
The guard-cop at left ordered a visitor to remove coffee and food from a bench.[Image]
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Books coming in to replace those trashed by Bloomberg.
No ban on books so in large numbers they may be used as materials to fabricate shelter.[Image]
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[Image]These gents appear leery of being photographed, and rightly so, due to persistent infiltration and photography by cops. Or could be undercover cops.

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Giant sculptures are now barricaded.[Image]
Barricades along Wall Street at the New York Stock Exchange have been reduced.[Image]
Horses have replaced heavily armed cops for tourist appeal, long pretending to protect the stock exchange.[Image]
The original Wall Street occupiers at Wall Street and Broadway protesting the folly over 200 years later.[Image]

	

UNCENSORED – Occupy Wall Street NYC Photos, 15 November 2011

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather to listen to speakers after being allowed back into Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. State Supreme Court Justice Michael Stallman upheld the city’s eviction of the protesters after an emergency appeal by the National Lawyers Guild. If crowds of demonstrators return to the park, they will not be allowed to bring tents, sleeping bags and other equipment that turned the area into a makeshift city of dissent. (Henny Ray Abrams) [Hi-res (1.6MB)]
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters return to Zuccotti Park on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. State Supreme Court Justice Michael Stallman upheld the city’s eviction of the protesters after an emergency appeal by the National Lawyers Guild. If crowds of demonstrators return to the park, they will not be allowed to bring tents, sleeping bags and other equipment that turned the area into a makeshift city of dissent. (Bebeto Matthews)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters return to Zuccotti Park with strict police enforced rules on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. State Supreme Court Justice Michael Stallman upheld the city’s eviction of the protesters after an emergency appeal by the National Lawyers Guild. (Bebeto Matthews)

[Image]Occupy Wall Street Encampment at Zuccotti Park seen is empty of demonstrators, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters hold a general assembly meeting inside an enclosed site near Canal Street on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Hundreds of police officers in riot gear before dawn Tuesday raided the New York City park where the Occupy Wall Street protests began, evicting and arresting hundreds of protesters from what has become the epicenter of the worldwide movement protesting corporate greed and economic inequality. (Seth Wenig) [Photo taken and transmitted before Seth Wenig was arrested along with the protestors.]
[Image]Police prepare to enter an enclosed site near Canal Street where Occupy Wall Street protesters gathered on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Hundreds of police officers in riot gear before dawn Tuesday raided the New York City park where the Occupy Wall Street protests began, evicting and arresting hundreds of protesters from what has become the epicenter of the worldwide movement protesting corporate greed and economic inequality. (Seth Wenig)

[Image]Occupy Wall Street activists gain entrance in to Duarte Square to protest after police removed the protesters early in the morning from Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers standoff with Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers clear out Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty [AP journalist Karen Matthews is at upper right in light blue jacket (and in earlier photos below). She was arrested with AP photographer Seth Wenig in following photo.]

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Cryptome photos, 3 October 2011.

[Image]Seth Wenig, a photographer for The Associated Press, was arrested on Thursday near Trinity Church. (Ozier Muhammad) [Wenig handcuffed with backpack at center in following photo, back to camera.]
[Image]NYPD officers arrest Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City.  Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers attempt to arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Police removed the protesters early in the morning from their encampment in Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of protesters, who rallied against inequality in America, have slept in tents and under tarps since September 17 in Zuccotti Park, which has since become the epicenter of the global Occupy movement. The raid in New York City follows recent similar moves in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon. Getty

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters return to Zuccotti Park on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. After an early police raid removing protesters, hundreds returned to Zuccotti Park carrying photocopies of a court order they say gives them the right to return to the park. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules.
[Image]Police arrest an Occupy Wall Street protester at Zuccotti Park on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. After an early police raid removing protesters, hundreds returned to Zuccotti Park carrying photocopies of a court order they say gives them the right to return there.
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters rally in a small park on Canal Street in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted the protesters from their base in Zuccotti Park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)
[Image]A police officer watches from the grounds of City Hall as Occupy Wall Street protesters linked hands to block media from attending a news conference held by Mayor Michael Bloomberg in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. The protesters eventually dispersed peacefully.
[Image]An empty and closed Zuccotti Park is seen in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted Occupy Wall Street protesters from the park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)
[Image]A pedestrian takes a picture of an empty and closed Zuccotti Park in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted Occupy Wall Street protesters from the park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)

[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor draws contact from a police officer near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave the longtime encampment in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park.

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[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters clash with police at Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor is arrested on the ground by police near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park.
[Image]A demonstrator yells at police officers as they order Occupy Wall Street protesters to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester yells out at police after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters clash with police near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters are pushed by police near the encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous.
[Image]Demonstrators clash with police after being ordered to leave the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police handed out notices earlier from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester is arrested by police near the encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents.
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor is arrested during a march on Broadway, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester is detained by police officers after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters are detained by police officers after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street demonstrators are arrested after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters march through the streets after they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011 in New York. Hundreds of police in riot gear dismantled the Occupy Oakland camp Monday, evicting and arresting protesters in the second such US move in as many days as authorities get tough against the two-month-old protest movement. Getty
[Image]A police officer carries trash through Zuccotti Park, the longtime encampment for Occupy Wall Street protesters in New York, as the cleanup effort begins early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Two protesters and their dog, who said they have stayed slept with other protesters for the last 56 nights, sit along a police barricade at the edge of Zuccotti Park in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 after the Occupy Wall Street encampment was cleared from the park in the early morning hours after a nearly two month occupation,wa;;w and before the park reopened. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]New York City sanitation crews clean Zuccotti Park after city officials evicted the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest from the park in the early morning hours of November 15, 2011 in New York. Occupy Wall Street protestors most feared the coming winter, but it was on the mildest of nights, when activists slept soundly in their tents, that New York police sprang a surprise operation to end the eight-week demonstration. Getty
[Image]People walk past New York Police Department officers guarding a closed Zuccotti Park after city officials evicted the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest from the park in the early morning hours of November 15, 2011 in New York. Getty

OCCUPY-Movement – Pepper Sprayed-Maced Protests Photos

[Image]In this Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, photo University of California, Davis Police Lt. John Pike uses pepper spray to move Occupy UC Davis protesters while blocking their exit from the school’s quad Friday in Davis, Calif. Two University of California, Davis police officers involved in pepper spraying seated protesters were placed on administrative leave Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011, as the chancellor of the school accelerates the investigation into the incident. (Wayne Tilcock)
[Image]In this Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, photo Occupy University of California, Davis, protesters including David Buscho, far left, react after being pepper sprayed by police who came to remove tents set up on the school’s quad Friday in Davis, Calif. Two University of California, Davis police officers involved in pepper spraying seated protesters were placed on administrative leave Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011, as the chancellor of the school accelerates the investigation into the incident. (Wayne Tilcock)
[Image]In this Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, photo occupy protester David Buscho is helped after being pepper sprayed by campus police while blocking their exit from the school’s Quad Friday in Davis, Calif. Two University of California, Davis police officers involved in pepper spraying seated protesters were placed on administrative leave Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011, as the chancellor of the school accelerates the investigation into the incident. (Wayne Tilcock)
[Image]In this image made from video, a police officer uses pepper spray as he walks down a line of Occupy demonstrators sitting on the ground at the University of California, Davis on Friday, Nov. 18, 2011. The video – posted on YouTube – was shot Friday as police moved in on more than a dozen tents erected on campus and arrested 10 people, nine of them students. AP

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[Image]University of California, Davis, student Mike Fetterman, receives a treatment for pepper spray by UC Davis firefighter Nate Potter, after campus police dismantled an Occupy Wall Street encampment on the campus quad in Davis, Calif. , Friday, Nov. 18, 2011. UC Davis officials say eight men and two women were taken into custody. AP
[Image]A police officer uses pepper spray on an Occupy Portland protestor at Pioneer Courthouse Square in Portland Ore. , Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. AP
[Image]A protester affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement pours liquid over the eyes of another fellow protester to ease the pain from pepper spray during an unannounced raid by the New York City Police Department outside Zuccotti Park in New York, in the early hours of November 15, 2011. Police wearing helmets and carrying shields evicted protesters with the Occupy Wall Street movement early on Tuesday from the park in New York City’s financial district where they have camped since September. Reuters
[Image]Seattle Police officers deploy pepper spray into a crowd during an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 at Westlake Park in Seattle. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper spray into the gathered crowd hitting dozens of people. AP
[Image]Seattle activist Dorli Rainey, 84, reacts after being hit with pepper spray during an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 at Westlake Park in Seattle. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper spray into the gathered crowd hitting dozens of people. AP
[Image]A woman who gave her name as Jennifer and said she was two months pregnant is rushed to an ambulance after being hit with pepper spray at an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 at Westlake Park in Seattle. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper spray into the gathered crowd hitting dozens of people. AP
[Image]A man is treated by fellow protesters after he was sprayed in the face with pepper spray by police during the Occupy Seattle’s protest against JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon in Seattle November 2, 2011. About 300 rain-soaked protesters blocked the street outside the Sheraton hotel where Dimon was scheduled to speak at an event organized by the University of Washington’s school of business. Reuters
[Image]A police officer escorts an Occupy Tulsa protestor who was pepper sprayed in the face while being arresting for an alleged curfew violation for inhabiting a city park at night at Centennial Green in downtown Tulsa, Okla. , early Wednesday morning Nov. 2, 2011. Police warned demonstrators that they were in violation of a city curfew and gave them the choice of leaving before applying pepper spray and forcibly removing demonstrators sitting in a circle at the park shortly before 2 a.m. AP
[Image]Protesters use a metal structure against riot police as the police use pepper spray against them during clashes outside the Greek parliament in Athens, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011. Greek anger over new austerity measures and layoffs erupted into violence outside parliament on Wednesday, as demonstrators hurled chunks of marble and gasoline bombs and riot police responded with tear gas and stun grenades that echoed across Athens’ main square. Wednesday was the first day of a two-day general strike that unions described as the largest protests in years, with at least 100,000 people marching through central Athens. AP
[Image]A San Diego Police officer maces a demonstrator at the Civic Center Plaza Friday, Oct. 14, 2011 in San Diego. Police on Friday began removing about a half-dozen tents after warning demonstrators that their personal belongings couldn’t stay in the Occupy San Diego camp. (Lenny Ignelzi)
[Image]A demonstrator receives help after San Diego Police used pepper spray during a demonstration at the Civic Center Plaza Friday, Oct. 14, 2011 in San Diego. Police on Friday began removing about a half-dozen tents after warning demonstrators that their personal belongings couldn’t stay in the Occupy San Diego camp. AP
[Image]A demomstrator tries to wash pepper spray from his eyes after a clash with the San Diego Police at the Civic Center Plaza Friday, Oct. 14, 2011 in San Diego. Police on Friday began removing about a half-dozen tents after warning demonstrators that their personal belongings couldn’t stay in the Occupy San Diego camp. AP
[Image]Two demonstrators cover themselves after San Diego Police used pepper spray during a protest at the Civic Center Plaza Friday, Oct. 14, 2011 in San Diego. Police on Friday began removing about a half-dozen tents after warning demonstrators that their personal belongings couldn’t stay in the Occupy San Diego camp. AP
[Image]One demonstrator helps another flush her eyes with water after after police pepper-sprayed a group of protestors, who were trying to get into the National Air and Space Museum in Washington Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)

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[Image]NYPD Deputy Inspector Anthony Bologna sprays protestors, 26 September 2011. Charlie Grapski via Daily Kos

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[Image]A protester is hit by pepper spray when police used them against protesters as they broke through a police cordon to carry out a sit-in protest in the Hong Kong’s central business district Friday, July 1, 2011, Tens of thousands people march to vent their anger over skyrocketing property prices and government policies, the 14th anniversary of the former British colony’s return to Chinese rule. AP
[Image]A riot police reacts, after his colleagues used pepper spray, against protesters outside the Health Ministry in Athens, Thursday, May 26, 2011. Police have used pepper spray to disperse protesting doctors and state hospital staff, in the latest protest against public spending cuts.
[Image]Israeli riot police detain a man whose face was sprayed with pepper spray during riots in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiya on May 13, 2011 as Israeli police flooded the streets of Jerusalem, fearing violence as Palestinians began marking the ‘Nakba’ or ‘catastrophe’ which befell them following Israel’s establishment in 1948.
[Image]Police spray pepper gas and water canons at protesters in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011, trying to stop a march on Parliament by workers protesting government-proposed legislation that they say will strip them of their rights. About ten thousands of workers, many of whom had traveled from across Turkey, had gathered in the capital Ankara and vowed to reach Parliament in defiance of laws that bar demonstrations near the assembly building. AP

 

CONFIDENTIAL-NYPD Patrol Guide Procedure 203-09: Officers Must Courteously Identify Themselves

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Civilians filed 231 allegations of “refusal to provide name and/or shield number” in 1999, 349 in 2000, 468 in 2001, and 636 in 2002, a 175% increase in just four years and an 82% increase in the last three years. During these same years, refusal to provide name and/or shield number constituted less than one percent, 5%, 8%, and 10% of all allegations the board substantiated. These increases led the CCRB to take a closer look at this allegation and summarize its findings in this report. As the basis for this mini-study, the agency chose to examine all complaints in which the civilian filed this allegation that the board closed after a full investigation between January 1 and June 30, 2002.

A word must first be said about the legal landscape in which this allegation exists. The New York City Police Department Patrol Guide, procedure 203-09 (Public Contact—General), states that officers must “give name and shield number to anyone requesting them.” New York City’s Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings (“OATH”) has issued a number of recent opinions that examine what this patrol guide procedure requires of officers. In essence, these cases have held that the patrol guide procedure imposes an “affirmative obligation” to “give name and shield number to anyone requesting them;” in other words, a demand for a name or badge number demands an “affirmative response.”

1. As a result of a recommendation contained in the 2002 “New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board’s Status Report” and in order to claritY the obligation of members of the service to provide their name and shield number to the public, Patrol Guide procedure 203-09, “Public Contact- General” has been revised.

2. Therefore, effective immediately, Patrol Guide procedure 203-09, “Public Contact – General,” is amended as follows:

a. REVISE current step “1″, page “1″ to read:

“PUBLIC CONTACT

1. Courteously and clearly state your rank, name, shield number and command, or otherwise provide them, to anyone who requests you to do so. Allow the person ample time to note this information.”

3. Any provisions of the Department manual or other Department directive in conflict with the contents of this order are suspended.

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NYPD-OfficerIdentifyYourself

CONFIDENTIAL-Clark Lytle Geduldig Cranford Occupy Wall Street Lobbyist Response Proposal for the American Bankers

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Leading Democratic party strategists have begun to openly discuss the benefits of embracing the growing and increasingly organized Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement to prevent Republican gains in Congress and the White House next year. We have seen this process of adopting extreme positions and movements to increase base voter turnout, including in the 2005-2006 immigration debate. This would mean more than just short-term political discomfort for Wall Street firms. If vilifying the leading companies of this sector is allowed to become an unchallenged centerpiece of a coordinated Democratic campaign, it has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.

It shouldn’t be surprising that the Democratic party or even President Obama’s re-election team would campaign against Wall Street in this cycle. However the bigger concern should be that Republicans will no longer defend Wall Street companies- and might start running against them too.

Well-known Wall Street companies stand at the nexus of where OWS protestors and the Tea Party overlap on angered populism. Both the radical left and t he radical right are channeling broader frustration about the state of the economy and share a mutual anger over TARP and other perceived bailouts. This combination has the potential to be explosive later in the year when media reports cover the next round of bonuses and contrast it with stories of millions of Americans making do with less this holiday season.

Democratic strategists have identified the OWS movement as a way to tap this populist anger. As an example, the L.A. Times reported that Robby Mook, executive director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, wrote an email to supporters saying “protestors are assembling in New York and around the country to let billionaires, big oil and big bankers know that we’re not going to let the richest 1% force draconian economic policies and massive cuts to crucial programs on Main Street Americans.”

They are certainly in the field right now testing messaging options and developing the plans to deploy them in ads, speeches, social media and grassroots communications as early as this year. The focus of those campaign efforts would be to tar the financial services sector- and in particular high-profile Wall Street investment house brands-as being responsible for the economic problems facing the country and middle class Americans. As the Democrat half of the well-known Battleground Survey polling team, Celinda Lake, said: “It has enormous potential.” It may be easy to dismiss OWS as a ragtag group of protestors but they have demonstrated that they should be treated more like an organized competitor who is very nimble and capable of working the media, coordinating third party support and engaging office holders to do their
bidding. To counter that, we have to do the same. Putting the cornerstone elements of a plan in place right now will prepare firms to respond quickly and collectively at the earliest and most influential point when embracing OWS goes from concept planning to execution. The cornerstone elements of a plan include: survey research and message testing, opposition research, targeted social media monitoring, coalition planning, and advertising creative and placement strategy development.

Targeted Social Media Monitoring

The transparency of social media platforms offers an excellent opportunity to anticipate future OWS tactics and messaging as well as identify extreme language and ideas that put its most ardent supporters at odds with mainstream Americans. These platforms may not be a place where engaging OWS supporters directly could be successful but with sophisticated monitoring and analytical tactics it could provide exceptional political intelligence.

Deliverable: We will conduct and report on an audit of most active social media platforms used by OWS with the identification of trends in their engagement. This audit will offer analysis of those trends and identify effective reporting tools to develop actionable intelligence that could be rapidly acted on when a campaign becomes fully operational.

Pricing

This initial effort to develop the cornerstone elements of a strategic campaign is achievable within 60 days and would best provide you with a range of effective response options if the move to adopt OWS continues on its current path. The cost of the deliverables identified above is $850,000.

DOWNLAOD ORIGINAL DOCUMENT HERE

Live at the Locations – Women Protest Worldwide Photos 7

[Image]Members of the Galician pro-indepence group Ceive stage a protest in favor of the transfert of jailed Galician independentist to Galician jails, next to a polling station in the village of Escravitude, some 20 kms from Santiago de Compostela, northwestern Spain, on November 20, 2011. Spaniards voted in rain-swept elections Sunday that were all but certain to hand a thundering victory to the right and topple yet another debt-laden eurozone government. Bowed by a 21,5 percent jobless rate, economic stagnation and deep spending cuts, the first voters of the 36 million-strong Spanish electorate headed to polls ready to punish the ruling Socialists. Getty
[Image]A protester gestures during clashes with Egyptian riot police, not seen, near the interior ministry in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011. Firing tear gas and rubber bullets, Egyptian riot police on Sunday clashed for a second day with thousands of rock-throwing protesters demanding that the ruling military quickly announce a date to hand over power to an elected government. (Tara Todras-Whitehill)
[Image]A protester overcome with tear gas inhalation is helped inside a cafe during clashes with the Egyptian riot police, not seen, near the interior ministry in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011. Firing tear gas and rubber bullets, Egyptian riot police on Sunday clashed for a second day with thousands of rock-throwing protesters demanding that the ruling military quickly announce a date to hand over power to an elected government. (Tara Todras-Whitehill)
[Image]Wounded protesters are seen in a field hospital during clashes with Egyptian riot police in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011. Firing tear gas and rubber bullets, Egyptian riot police on Sunday clashed for a second day with thousands of rock-throwing protesters demanding that the ruling military quickly announce a date to hand over power to an elected government. (Khalil Hamra)
[Image]Occupy Oakland protester Abby Balanda demonstrates during a march through Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011. Anti-Wall Street protesters in Oakland pushed down a chain-link fence surrounding a city-owned vacant lot where they planned a new encampment on Saturday. (Noah Berger)
[Image]An Occupy Oakland protester, who declined to give her name, pitches a tent to establish a new encampment in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011. Police raided the group’s previous camp on Monday. Anti-Wall Street protesters in Oakland pushed down a chain-link fence surrounding a city-owned vacant lot where they planned a new encampment on Saturday. (Noah Berger)
[Image]A police officer arrests a demonstrator affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement as they block the entrance to the New York Stock Exchange on Broad Street, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011 in New York. Two days after the encampment that sparked the global Occupy protest movement was cleared by authorities, demonstrators marched through New York’s financial district and promised a national day of action with mass gatherings in other cities. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Police officers arrest a demonstrator affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011 in New York. Two days after the encampment that sparked the global Occupy protest movement was cleared by authorities, demonstrators marched through New York’s financial district and promised a national day of action with mass gatherings in other cities. (Mary Altaffer)[Image]
[Image]Naked Israeli women pose for a photograph in Tel Aviv, November 19, 2011, to show solidarity with Egyptian blogger Aliaa Magda Elmahdy, who put naked pictures of herself on the Internet, support free expression and protest against Islamic extremism. The banner reads: “Love With No Boundaries”. Picture taken November 19, 2011. Reuters
[Image]Tibetan Buddhist nun Palden Choetso sits in a house, in this handout picture taken in 1998 and recently released by the http://www.freetibet. org organisation. The 35-year-old Tibetan Buddhist nun burned herself to death on a public street an hour’s drive away on November 3, 2011, the latest in a string of self-immolations to protest against Chinese religious controls over Tibet. In China, eleven Tibetan monks and nuns — some former clergy — have resorted to the extreme protest since March this year. At least six have been fatal. Reuters
[Image]Activists are blocked by the police during a march against the use of fur on November 19, 2011 in Paris, France. The march, in its third year, is held to protest the use of animal fur in fashion and animal cruelty. Getty
[Image]Pro-Syrian regime protesters shout pro-Syrian President Bashar Assad slogans during a demonstration to show their soldarity with their president, in Damascus, Syria, on Sunday Nov. 20, 2011. Residents in the Syrian capital awoke to two loud explosions Sunday amid reports from activists that the Damascus headquarters of the ruling Baath party had been hit by several rocket-propelled grenades. But eyewitnesses said the party headquarters appeared intact and reported no significant security deployments.
[Image]Women supporters hold placards during a protest organised by Awami National Conference in Srinagar on November 19, 2011. The protesters demanded revocation of Armed Forces Special Powers Act in restive Kashmir. The draconian Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) was introduced in 1990 to give the army and paramilitary forces sweeping powers to detain people, use deadly force and destroy property. Violence is at its lowest in Indian Kashmir since the start of the insurgency that has so far left more than 47,000 people dead by official count but separatists putting the toll twice as high. Getty
[Image]Spain’s ‘indignant’ protesters demostrate in the Puerta del Sol square in Madrid on November 19, 2011 against spending cuts, high unemployment and political corruption, a week before a general election. Spain’s so-called ‘indignant’ protest movement was born when thousands of people set up camp in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square ahead of May 22 municipal elections. Getty
[Image]A female protester gestures as she argues with Egyptian riot police officers in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011. Egyptian riot police beat protesters and dismantled a small tent city set up to commemorate revolutionary martyrs in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Saturday. (Khalil Hamra)
[Image]Egyptian women wave flags during a rally in Cairo’s Tahrir square, Egypt, Friday, Nov.18, 2011, in a protest against what they say are attempts by the country’s military rulers to reinforce their powers. The rally Friday was dominated by the country’s most organized political group, the Muslim Brotherhood.
[Image]Egyptian Laila Soueif, at left, the mother of prominent blogger Alaa Abdel-Fattah who was jailed by Egypt’s ruling generals, who is on hunger strike to protest her son’s detention, as they celebrate Alaa’s 30th birthday in Cairo’s Tahrir square, Friday, Nov. 18, 2011. At Friday’s rally in Tahrir square, protesters gathered to celebrate the birthday of one of the most prominent revolutionary bloggers to be jailed by the military prosecutor. (Amr Nabil)
[Image]Bahraini demonstrators gesture Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, in A’ali, Bahrain, in front of a replica of the massive protest encampment that was demolished by government forces last spring in the crackdown on a pro-democracy uprising, complete with tents and a model of the landmark pearl monument (unseen). Thousands of Shiite-led protesters calling for greater rights streamed into the area outside the capital of Manama in one of the largest demonstrations in weeks against the Gulf kingdom’s rulers.
[Image]Muslims rally in Foley Square during a protest of ethnic profiling by law enforcement on November 18, 2011 in New York City. Muslims held a rally and Friday prayers and were joined by protesters affiliated with Occupy Wall Street. Getty
[Image]Animal activists, painted in “blood”, lie on a pile of fur during a protest in Belgrade November 18, 2011. The protest was held in conjunction with the “anti-fur” campaign in Europe. Reuters
[Image]Syrians living in Turkey write ‘Freedom’ with their blood during a protest against the government of Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in front of the Syrian consulate in Istanbul, on November 18, 2011. Turkey added its voice Friday to warnings that civil war threatens Syria, while France’s top diplomat called for stepped up sanctions against Damascus, which he said had left it too late to reform. Getty
[Image]Opponents of ousted Thai premier Thaksin Shinawatra hold banners as they shout during a protest in central Bangkok November 18, 2011. Opponents of Thaksin Shinawatra said on Thursday they could take to the streets if the government led by his sister tried to push through an amnesty that would let him return from exile a free man. Reuters
[Image]Muslims listen during a rally in Foley Square to protest against the NYPD surveillance operations of Muslim communities, Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, in New York. Hundreds of Muslims gathered in prayer Friday to oppose a decade of police spying on Muslim communities. The crowd filled about three-fourths of Foley Square in lower Manhattan, not far from City Hall. Demonstrators were scheduled to march on police headquarters (Bebeto Matthews)
[Image]Dorli Rainey, 84, left, who was pepper-sprayed by police last Tuesday while taking part in an “Occupy Seattle” protest, speaks Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, in front of police headquarters in downtown Seattle. Rainey and several dozen others marched to the station Friday and held the rally to call attention to how protesters have been treated. (Ted S. Warren)
[Image]Virila Perez, left, and Francisco Gonzalez, who work as municipal trash collectors, demonstrate against proposed lay-offs by lying on broken glass in Asuncion, Paraguay, Friday Nov. 18, 2011. Asuncion’s municipal government is proposing cuts in employment to reduce the cost of municipal workers to 60% of the city budget. The sign covering them reads in Spanish “Until the final fight, overcome or die.” (Jorge Saenz)
[Image]Annette Jones waits with other demonstrators to be arrested during a protest organized by Occupy Chicago and Stand Up Chicago November 17, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. The demonstration was one of many protests held nationwide to mark the second month of the Occupy Wall Street protests. Getty
[Image]Occupy Seattle protestors demonstrate at the University Bridge, temporarily shutting it down, after meeting others from Seattle Central Community College during a national day of action, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011, in Seattle. Traffic was snarled around Seattle’s University District as two rallies marched toward the bridge. (Kevin P. Casey)
[Image]Eugene Police officers carry an Occupy Eugene protester away after arresting her for blocking the entrance to a Chase Bank in Eugene, Ore. Nov. 17, 2011. Occupy Eugene protesters spent an afternoon demonstrating at bank offices, and 17 were arrested. (Chris Pietsch)
[Image]A Occupy Portland protester is arrested by Portland Police officers after protesters take over a Wells Fargo bank Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011, in Portland, Ore. Occupy Wall Street demonstrators held modestly sized, but energetic rallies around the country Thursday to celebrate two months since the movement’s birth and signal that they aren’t ready to quit yet, despite police raids that have destroyed some of their encampments. (Rick Bowmer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters walk across the Brooklyn Bridge after a rally in Foley Square, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011 in New York. Organizers with the Service Employees International Union and progressive groups staged similar bridge marches in several cities in an event that was planned weeks ago, but happened to coincide with rallies marking two months since the start of the Occupy movement (Henny Ray Abrams)
[Image]Protesters willing to be arrested, including Donna Cassult, left, of Minneapolis, linked arms and sat on the roadway of the 10th Ave. Bridge in Minneapolis and waited for police to place them in custody Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. Demonstrators peacefully shut down the 10th Ave. Bridge during rush hour to call attention to the need for more jobs and racial equality in employment.
[Image]Police officers arrest a demonstrators affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011 in New York. Two days after the encampment that sparked the global Occupy protest movement was cleared by authorities, demonstrators marched through New York’s financial district and promised a national day of action with mass gatherings in other cities. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]20-year-old Egyptian blogger Aliaa Mahdy. Photograph: Aliaa Mahdy

Live at the Locations – Women Protest Worldwide Photos 6

[Image]Spanish ‘indignant’ protesters hold a placard reading ‘We do not want fascists’ during a protest in front of a campaign meeting of the far-right party ‘Plataforma per Catalunya’ on November 13, 2011 in Barcelona. Hundreds of Spain’s ‘indignant’ protesters marched through the streets of Madrid Sunday to protest spending cuts, high unemployment and political corruption, a week before a general election. In Barcelona about 30 members of the movement decided at an assembly Saturday to camp out in the Plaza de Catalunya until the general election on November 20. Getty
[Image]Two girls holds a coffin with a doll inside that wearing a mask with the faces of presidential candidates of Popular Party Mariano Rajoy and Socialist Party Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba during a demonstration against the government and banks in Madrid on Sunday, Nov. 13, 2011. Spain goes to the polls for presidential elections on November 20. (Arturo Rodriguez)
[Image]Public workers march during a protest in Lisbon’s main avenue of Liberdade November 12, 2011. Public workers, policemen and military personnel are holding several protests in Lisbon against the job and 2012 state budget cuts. Reuters
[Image]A woman holds up a sign that reads “No is No” as she takes part in the “Marcha de las Putas” (SlutWalk), held to protest against discrimination and violence against women in Lima, November 12, 2011. The march is part of the SlutWalk protest movement which started after a policeman advised women students in Canada to “avoid dressing like sluts”. Reuters
[Image]Pro-Syrian regime protesters, hold up portraits of Syrian President Bashar Assad with Arabic words: ” The lion (Assad) of resistance and the rejectionism” during a demonstration against the Arab League decision to suspend Syria in front the Syrian embassy, in Beirut, Lebanon, on Sunday Nov. 13, 2011. Tens of thousands of pro-regime demonstrators gathered in a Damascus square Sunday to protest the Arab League’s vote to suspend Syria over its bloody crackdown on the country’s eight-month-old uprising.
[Image]Syrian protesters shout anti-Syrian Preident Bashar Assad slogans during a protest in front of the Arab League headquarters in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011 where the League emergency session on Syria is to discuss the country’s failure to end bloodshed caused by government crackdowns on civil protests. Protesters called the Arab League to suspend the country’s membership. Arabic read ” step out, we need to build civilian modern country” (Amr Nabil)
[Image]Demonstrators with cooking pots and colanders on their heads stand in front of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011. Thousands of people formed a human chain around the Frankfurt bank towers protesting against the power of banks. German police say more than ten thousand people are protesting against the banks’ dominance in two of the country’s major cities.
[Image]A group of protesters prepare their signs before heading out into the ocean to hold an anti-APEC protest at Waikiki Beach in Honolulu on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 as the summit is held in Oahu over the weekend. (Marco Garcia)
[Image]Demonstrators hold a ribbon reading “smash banks, redistribute wealth” in front of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011. Thousands of people formed a human chain with the ribbon around the Frankfurt bank towers to protest against the power of banks.Thousands of people formed a human chain around the Frankfurt bank towers protesting against the worldwide power of banks. German police say more than ten thousand people are protesting against the banks’ dominance in two of the country’s major cities.
[Image]Protestors march through downtown Lisbon during a demonstration by military personnel associations against austerity measures Saturday, Nov. 12 2011. The Portuguese government plans to introduce more pay cuts and steep tax hikes next year while the country is struggling to restore its fiscal health despite a euro78 billion ($106 billion) bailout earlier this year. Banner reads ” Amnesty for the military punished for offenses of opinion” refering to military who have been punished for taking part in protests.
[Image]Students march against government plans to reform higher education in Medellin, Colombia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of students march in the country’s main cities despite President Juan Manuel Santos’ proposal to withdraw a reform bill on higher education. (Luis Benavides)
[Image]A UCLA student arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after she attempted to escape after eleven student protesters sat in circle in middle of the Westwood and Wilshire boulevard intersection as part of a protest of bank practices and rising fees at public universities on November 9, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. The protest organized by ReFund California was one of several planned at universities around the state. Getty
[Image]Students demonstrate against an education reform bill in Bogota, on November 10, 2011. Thousands of students from more than 30 public universities took to the streets in Colombia to protest against proposed education reforms they fear will partially privatize higher education. The students have been on strike over the past month to protest a bill put forward by President Juan Manuel Santos that would require public universities to generate some of their own revenues. On Wednesday Santos offered to withdraw the draft and open a dialogue if the more than half a million students on strike lift their form of pressure. Getty
[Image]A demonstrator holds a banner against the ECB in Naples on November 11, 2011 during a rally called ‘Occupy Napoli’ (Occupy Naples), refering to the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York, to protest against banks and international financial power. Getty
[Image]Hungarian and foreign activists and sympathizers of the ‘True Democracy Now’ group hold banners reading ‘Direct Democracy’ (R) and ‘Be part’, (L) as an elderly woman mouth’s is covered by a fake 1000 euro bill in front the central bank of Budapest on November 11, 2011 during a demonstration for a better and livable world and to protest against the political and economical system. Getty
[Image]A protester holds a sign reading “Neither Tremonti nor Monti” during a protest in front of the Ministry of Finance in Rome November 11, 2011. The package of austerity measures that were demanded by the European Union will now go to the Italian lower house, which is expected to approve it on Saturday. That vote will trigger the resignation of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi. The signs refer to Italian Finance Minister Giulio Tremonti and former European Commissioner Mario Monti, who is tipped as the favourite to replace Berlusconi. Reuters
[Image]A Yemeni woman covers her mouth with her hand painted in the colours of the national flag during to a protest against the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh in the capital Sanaa, on November11, 2011. Forces loyal to Yemeni President Abdullah Saleh shelled the country’s second largest city Taez, killing nine people, among them two women and a child, a medic and witnesses said. Getty
[Image]A protester holding a banner camps outside the Banca d’Italia on November 11, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Protest in several Italian cities have been called by the Indignados, students, social centres and other organizations for today 11.11.11 to protest against financial insitutions and cuts proposed by the Government. Getty
[Image]Dalbir Kaur, sister of Indian national Sarabjit Singh on death row in Pakistan, second right, along with supporters of All India Youth Foundation takes an oath for securing his release in front of the India Gate war memorial at 11:11 am, in New Delhi, India, Friday, Nov. 11, 2011. A placard on left reads, “People’s Voice, Sarabjit.” (Gurinder Osan)
[Image]An Indonesian Muslim woman wears a Palestinian flag face mask during a solidarity protest for the Palestinian people in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. (Irwin Fedriansyah)
[Image]Demonstrators of a group “Occupy Rio” protest against Rio de Janeiro’s governor Sergio Cabral in downtown Rio de Janeiro November 10, 2011. The demonstration, inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement, seeks to address the corruption in the police and the problems with the health care system under the governance of Cabral. Cabral had originally organized a demonstration to rally against an oil reform amendment approved by the lower house of Congress. Reuters
[Image]Protesters from the communist-affiliated trade union PAME shout slogans during an anti-government protest in Athens November 10, 2011. Greece named former European Central Bank vice-president Lucas Papademos on Thursday to head a crisis government, ending a chaotic search for a leader to save the country from default, bankruptcy and an exit from the euro zone. Reuters
[Image]A demonstrator marches during a student protest against government plans to reform higher education at the main square in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of students marched in the country’s main cities despite a government proposal to withdraw a reform bill on higher education. (William Fernando Martinez)
[Image]People wave flags of Rio de Janeiro state during a protest against an oil reform amendment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of Brazilians are demonstrating against a plan that reduces revenue for oil-producing states and the federal government while increasing oil royalties for non-producing states. (Felipe Dana)
[Image]Christian fundamentalist holds a candle during a demonstration against Italian director Romeo Castellucci’s play “On the Concept of the Face, Regarding the Son of God” in Rennes, western France, Thursday Nov. 10, 2011. Christian fundamentalists gathered outside the cultural palace the Theatre National de Bretagne, (National Theatre of Brittany), to protest against the play which they claim is blasphemous. (David Vincent)
[Image]One of the students with peaceful attitude cleans the shield of a riot policemen that was stained with paint by more violent protesters, during a demonstration against an education reform bill at Bogota’s main square Plaza de Bolivar, on November 10, 2011. Thousands of students from more than 30 public universities took to the streets in Colombia to protest against proposed education reforms they fear will partially privatize higher education. The students have been on strike over the past month to protest a bill put forward by President Juan Manuel Santos that would require public universities to generate some of their own revenues. On Wednesday Santos offered to withdraw the draft and open a dialogue if the more than half a million students on strike lift their form of pressure. Getty
[Image]NOVEMBER 09: UCLA graduate student Cheryl Deutsch is arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after she and 10 other student protesters sat in circle in middle of the Westwood and Wilshire boulevard intersection as part of a protest of bank practices and rising fees at public universities on November 9, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. The protest organized by ReFund California was one of several planned at universities around the state. Getty
[Image]A woman shouts out as police officers move into the crowd of demonstrators and push people back during a student anti-cuts protest in London, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. Thousands of students marched through central London on Wednesday to protest cuts to public spending and a big increase in university tuition fees. Police said there were “a number of arrests for public order offenses” Wednesday, but the march was largely peaceful as demonstrators made their way through the city center.
[Image]A protester cries out as students and campaigners march through the streets of London in a protest against higher tuition fees and government cuts, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. (Sang Tan)
[Image]A lone protester stands outside the Scottsdale Plaza Resort to protest Republican Presidential candidate Herman Cain who was addressing the media Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Cain said Tuesday that he would not drop his bid for the Republicans’ presidential nomination in the face of decade-old allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (Charlie Leight)
[Image]Two members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) who are covered from head to toe in green and blue bodypaint, as they hold a banner reading, “Save the Planet, Go Vegan,” at the Nanjing pedestrian street in Shanghai, China Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. (Eugene Hoshiko)
[Image]Protestors from Occupy Philly participate in a ‘die in’ demonstration outside a PNC Bank branch in Philadelphia on Monday Nov. 7, 2011. The demonstration was conducted to draw attention to PNC Bank’s business practices. (Joseph Kaczmarek)
[Image]A Syrian woman, who lives in Cairo, reacts as others wave a giant Syrian revolution flag during an anti-Syrian President Bashar Assad demonstration at Tahrir Square, the focal point of Egyptian uprisings, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 to support protesters in Syria during the first day of Islamic Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice. (Amr Nabil)
[Image]An activist of the Ukrainian female rights organization “Femen” shows a placard demanding freedom for women, during a protest at the end of Pope Benedict XVI’s Angelus prayer in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. (Pier Paolo Cito)
[Image]Yemeni girls hold a giant Yemeni flag, left, as Syrians hold their revolution flag, right, during a protest against Yemeni and Syrian regimes at Tahrir Square, the focal point of Egyptian uprising, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 to support protesters in Yemen and Syria during the first day of Islamic Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice. (Amr Nabil)
[Image]Amy Barnes protests as police move in to clear a downtown street during an Occupy Atlanta demonstration late Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 in Atlanta. (David Goldman)
[Image]In this Nov. 27, 2010 file photo, Susanna Camusso, leader of Italy’s largest labor confederation CGIL, arrives to deliver her speech during a demonstration to protest government policies regarding the economical crisis, in Rome. In an interview with The Associated Press Monday Nov. 7, 2011, Camusso is predicting 2012 will be a “terrifying” year for the economy even if beleaguered Premier Silvio Berlusconi leaves power soon.

Occupy Wall Street NYC Photos

Media Interviews Julian Assange after Secret Meeting with DoJ on Plea Deal to Heave Bradley Manning from Freedom Tower[Image]
NYPD: If You See Something Say Something[Image]
Media Has Lost Interest in OWS[Image]
Arrow Taken in Ear Union Trooper Packs Egg-Stash Bivouac after Gettysburg Chicken-Out[Image]
Student Debt Too Big to Fail[Image]
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Fall-out Data Gathering[Image]
Jim, It Asked About You[Image]
Pigeons There, Me Here, Where’s Justice[Image]
As She Sashays, the Cop Watch Tower Tumesces[Image]
Home Sweet Home Wet[Image]
Pizza Conga[Image]
Narcissist Eyes Photographer Twin[Image]
Her Excellency Protestor and Merc Spearchucker[Image]
Mic Checking a Senior Cop While 292-Cop Prepares to Loogie[Image]
National Lawyer Guild Rep ID-Checks Prideful Illegal Alien[Image]
Memorial to Immolated Tibetan[Image]
Medical Team Back from Patching Cop Whackamoles[Image]
Another Medical Team Back from Wiping Hegemon Spittle[Image]
Cops Reassemble Un-Zipped Barricades After Masked Man Eats Plastic Tie[Image]
Senior Police Official’s Warm and Dry Pussy Wagon Quietly Rockabyeing Whiles Eyes are Averted.[Image]
Constitutionally Coddled Media Covering Wall Street from Remote Studios.[Image]
Beshitten Sergeant Coddling the Bull’s Balls While Sweettalking Mommie Dearest[Image]
Wall Street Security Crud at the South Portal to Inevitable Revolution[Image]

	

ORIGINAL DOCUMENT – Occupy Toronto Eviction Notice

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NOTICE UNDER THE TRESPASS TO PROPERTY ACT – NOVEMBER 15, 2011

You are hereby given notice that you are prohibited from engaging in the following activities in St. James Park and in any other City of Toronto park:

1. Installing, erecting or maintaining a tent, shelter or other structure;

2. Using, entering or gathering in the park between the hours of 12:01 a.m. and 5:30 a.m..

The City of Toronto hereby directs you immediately to stop engaging in the activities listed above and to remove immediately any tent, shelter, structure, equipment and debris from St. James Park. If you do not immediately remove any and all tents, shelters, structures, equipment and debris from St. James Park, such tents, shelters, structures, equipment and debris shall be removed from St. James Park by or on behalf of the City of Toronto. You are further ordered immediately to stop using, entering or gathering in St. James Park between the hours of 12:01 a.m. and 5:30 a.m..

Please be advised that this notice may be enforced in accordance with the provisions of the Trespass to Property Act, R.S.O. 1990 c. T21 or by any other legal means available to the City of Toronto. Please be further advised that under the Trespass to Property Act, every person who engages in an activity on premises when the activity has been prohibited under the Act is guilty of an offence and is liable, on conviction, to a fine of not more than $2000.

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OccupyTorontoEviction

Occupy Wall Street NYC Photos

Liberty Park is encircled with tied-together barricades, with only two points of entry to the park, one each along Liberty and Cedar Streets.[Image]
Green-vested “guards” are numerous. These outnumber the few police outside the park.
Some of the guards appear to be undercover cops, perhaps all of them.[Image]
The guard-cop at left ordered a visitor to remove coffee and food from a bench.[Image]
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Books coming in to replace those trashed by Bloomberg.
No ban on books so in large numbers they may be used as materials to fabricate shelter.[Image]
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[Image]These gents appear leery of being photographed, and rightly so, due to persistent infiltration and photography by cops. Or could be undercover cops.[Image]
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Giant sculptures are now barricaded.[Image]
Barricades along Wall Street at the New York Stock Exchange have been reduced.[Image]
Horses have replaced heavily armed cops for tourist appeal, long pretending to protect the stock exchange.[Image]
The original Wall Street occupiers at Wall Street and Broadway protesting the folly over 200 years later.[Image]

	

Occupy Wall Street NYC Photos, 15 November 2011

[Image]Occupy Wall Street Encampment at Zuccotti Park seen is empty of demonstrators, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters hold a general assembly meeting inside an enclosed site near Canal Street on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Hundreds of police officers in riot gear before dawn Tuesday raided the New York City park where the Occupy Wall Street protests began, evicting and arresting hundreds of protesters from what has become the epicenter of the worldwide movement protesting corporate greed and economic inequality. (Seth Wenig) [Photo taken and transmitted before Seth Wenig was arrested along with the protestors.]
[Image]Police prepare to enter an enclosed site near Canal Street where Occupy Wall Street protesters gathered on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Hundreds of police officers in riot gear before dawn Tuesday raided the New York City park where the Occupy Wall Street protests began, evicting and arresting hundreds of protesters from what has become the epicenter of the worldwide movement protesting corporate greed and economic inequality. (Seth Wenig)

[Image]Occupy Wall Street activists gain entrance in to Duarte Square to protest after police removed the protesters early in the morning from Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers standoff with Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers clear out Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty [AP journalist Karen Matthews is at upper right in light blue jacket (and in earlier photos below). She was arrested with AP photographer Seth Wenig (at center in following photo).][Image][Image]
Cryptome photos, 3 October 2011.
[Image]NYPD officers arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City.  Getty
[Image]NYPD officers attempt to arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest an Occupy Wall Street activist after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Getty
[Image]NYPD officers arrest Occupy Wall Street activists after they gained entrance in to the private park next to Duarte Square to protest on November 15, 2011 in New York City. Police removed the protesters early in the morning from their encampment in Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of protesters, who rallied against inequality in America, have slept in tents and under tarps since September 17 in Zuccotti Park, which has since become the epicenter of the global Occupy movement. The raid in New York City follows recent similar moves in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon. Getty

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters return to Zuccotti Park on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. After an early police raid removing protesters, hundreds returned to Zuccotti Park carrying photocopies of a court order they say gives them the right to return to the park. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules.
[Image]Police arrest an Occupy Wall Street protester at Zuccotti Park on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 in New York. After an early police raid removing protesters, hundreds returned to Zuccotti Park carrying photocopies of a court order they say gives them the right to return there.
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters rally in a small park on Canal Street in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted the protesters from their base in Zuccotti Park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)
[Image]A police officer watches from the grounds of City Hall as Occupy Wall Street protesters linked hands to block media from attending a news conference held by Mayor Michael Bloomberg in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. The protesters eventually dispersed peacefully.
[Image]An empty and closed Zuccotti Park is seen in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted Occupy Wall Street protesters from the park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)
[Image]A pedestrian takes a picture of an empty and closed Zuccotti Park in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police officers evicted Occupy Wall Street protesters from the park overnight. The National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing the protesters to return with their tents to the park, where they have camped for two months. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on the protesters. (Seth Wenig)

[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor draws contact from a police officer near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave the longtime encampment in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park.[Image]

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[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters clash with police at Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor is arrested on the ground by police near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park.
[Image]A demonstrator yells at police officers as they order Occupy Wall Street protesters to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester yells out at police after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters clash with police near Zuccotti Park after being ordered to leave their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters are pushed by police near the encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous.
[Image]Demonstrators clash with police after being ordered to leave the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. Police handed out notices earlier from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester is arrested by police near the encampment at Zuccotti Park in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents.
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protestor is arrested during a march on Broadway, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011, in New York, after police ordered demonstrators to leave their encampment in Zuccotti Park. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester is detained by police officers after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters are detained by police officers after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street demonstrators are arrested after being ordered to leave Zuccotti Park, their longtime encampment in New York, early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters march through the streets after they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on November 15, 2011 in New York. Hundreds of police in riot gear dismantled the Occupy Oakland camp Monday, evicting and arresting protesters in the second such US move in as many days as authorities get tough against the two-month-old protest movement. Getty
[Image]A police officer carries trash through Zuccotti Park, the longtime encampment for Occupy Wall Street protesters in New York, as the cleanup effort begins early Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011. At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, police handed out notices from the park’s owner, Brookfield Office Properties, and the city saying that the park had to be cleared because it had become unsanitary and hazardous. Protesters were told they could return, but without sleeping bags, tarps or tents. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Two protesters and their dog, who said they have stayed slept with other protesters for the last 56 nights, sit along a police barricade at the edge of Zuccotti Park in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011 after the Occupy Wall Street encampment was cleared from the park in the early morning hours after a nearly two month occupation,wa;;w and before the park reopened. (Craig Ruttle)
[Image]New York City sanitation crews clean Zuccotti Park after city officials evicted the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest from the park in the early morning hours of November 15, 2011 in New York. Occupy Wall Street protestors most feared the coming winter, but it was on the mildest of nights, when activists slept soundly in their tents, that New York police sprang a surprise operation to end the eight-week demonstration. Getty
[Image]People walk past New York Police Department officers guarding a closed Zuccotti Park after city officials evicted the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest from the park in the early morning hours of November 15, 2011 in New York. Getty

Women Protest Worldwide Photos 5

[Image]Spanish ‘indignant’ protesters hold a placard reading ‘We do not want fascists’ during a protest in front of a campaign meeting of the far-right party ‘Plataforma per Catalunya’ on November 13, 2011 in Barcelona. Hundreds of Spain’s ‘indignant’ protesters marched through the streets of Madrid Sunday to protest spending cuts, high unemployment and political corruption, a week before a general election. In Barcelona about 30 members of the movement decided at an assembly Saturday to camp out in the Plaza de Catalunya until the general election on November 20. Getty
[Image]Two girls holds a coffin with a doll inside that wearing a mask with the faces of presidential candidates of Popular Party Mariano Rajoy and Socialist Party Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba during a demonstration against the government and banks in Madrid on Sunday, Nov. 13, 2011. Spain goes to the polls for presidential elections on November 20. (Arturo Rodriguez)
[Image]Public workers march during a protest in Lisbon’s main avenue of Liberdade November 12, 2011. Public workers, policemen and military personnel are holding several protests in Lisbon against the job and 2012 state budget cuts. Reuters
[Image]A woman holds up a sign that reads “No is No” as she takes part in the “Marcha de las Putas” (SlutWalk), held to protest against discrimination and violence against women in Lima, November 12, 2011. The march is part of the SlutWalk protest movement which started after a policeman advised women students in Canada to “avoid dressing like sluts”. Reuters
[Image]Pro-Syrian regime protesters, hold up portraits of Syrian President Bashar Assad with Arabic words: ” The lion (Assad) of resistance and the rejectionism” during a demonstration against the Arab League decision to suspend Syria in front the Syrian embassy, in Beirut, Lebanon, on Sunday Nov. 13, 2011. Tens of thousands of pro-regime demonstrators gathered in a Damascus square Sunday to protest the Arab League’s vote to suspend Syria over its bloody crackdown on the country’s eight-month-old uprising.
[Image]Syrian protesters shout anti-Syrian Preident Bashar Assad slogans during a protest in front of the Arab League headquarters in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011 where the League emergency session on Syria is to discuss the country’s failure to end bloodshed caused by government crackdowns on civil protests. Protesters called the Arab League to suspend the country’s membership. Arabic read ” step out, we need to build civilian modern country” (Amr Nabil)
[Image]Demonstrators with cooking pots and colanders on their heads stand in front of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011. Thousands of people formed a human chain around the Frankfurt bank towers protesting against the power of banks. German police say more than ten thousand people are protesting against the banks’ dominance in two of the country’s major cities.
[Image]A group of protesters prepare their signs before heading out into the ocean to hold an anti-APEC protest at Waikiki Beach in Honolulu on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 as the summit is held in Oahu over the weekend. (Marco Garcia)
[Image]Demonstrators hold a ribbon reading “smash banks, redistribute wealth” in front of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, Saturday, Nov.12, 2011. Thousands of people formed a human chain with the ribbon around the Frankfurt bank towers to protest against the power of banks.Thousands of people formed a human chain around the Frankfurt bank towers protesting against the worldwide power of banks. German police say more than ten thousand people are protesting against the banks’ dominance in two of the country’s major cities.
[Image]Protestors march through downtown Lisbon during a demonstration by military personnel associations against austerity measures Saturday, Nov. 12 2011. The Portuguese government plans to introduce more pay cuts and steep tax hikes next year while the country is struggling to restore its fiscal health despite a euro78 billion ($106 billion) bailout earlier this year. Banner reads ” Amnesty for the military punished for offenses of opinion” refering to military who have been punished for taking part in protests.
[Image]Students march against government plans to reform higher education in Medellin, Colombia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of students march in the country’s main cities despite President Juan Manuel Santos’ proposal to withdraw a reform bill on higher education. (Luis Benavides)
[Image]A UCLA student arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after she attempted to escape after eleven student protesters sat in circle in middle of the Westwood and Wilshire boulevard intersection as part of a protest of bank practices and rising fees at public universities on November 9, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. The protest organized by ReFund California was one of several planned at universities around the state. Getty
[Image]Students demonstrate against an education reform bill in Bogota, on November 10, 2011. Thousands of students from more than 30 public universities took to the streets in Colombia to protest against proposed education reforms they fear will partially privatize higher education. The students have been on strike over the past month to protest a bill put forward by President Juan Manuel Santos that would require public universities to generate some of their own revenues. On Wednesday Santos offered to withdraw the draft and open a dialogue if the more than half a million students on strike lift their form of pressure. Getty
[Image]A demonstrator holds a banner against the ECB in Naples on November 11, 2011 during a rally called ‘Occupy Napoli’ (Occupy Naples), refering to the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York, to protest against banks and international financial power. Getty
[Image]Hungarian and foreign activists and sympathizers of the ‘True Democracy Now’ group hold banners reading ‘Direct Democracy’ (R) and ‘Be part’, (L) as an elderly woman mouth’s is covered by a fake 1000 euro bill in front the central bank of Budapest on November 11, 2011 during a demonstration for a better and livable world and to protest against the political and economical system. Getty
[Image]A protester holds a sign reading “Neither Tremonti nor Monti” during a protest in front of the Ministry of Finance in Rome November 11, 2011. The package of austerity measures that were demanded by the European Union will now go to the Italian lower house, which is expected to approve it on Saturday. That vote will trigger the resignation of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi. The signs refer to Italian Finance Minister Giulio Tremonti and former European Commissioner Mario Monti, who is tipped as the favourite to replace Berlusconi. Reuters
[Image]A Yemeni woman covers her mouth with her hand painted in the colours of the national flag during to a protest against the regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh in the capital Sanaa, on November11, 2011. Forces loyal to Yemeni President Abdullah Saleh shelled the country’s second largest city Taez, killing nine people, among them two women and a child, a medic and witnesses said. Getty
[Image]A protester holding a banner camps outside the Banca d’Italia on November 11, 2011 in Venice, Italy. Protest in several Italian cities have been called by the Indignados, students, social centres and other organizations for today 11.11.11 to protest against financial insitutions and cuts proposed by the Government. Getty
[Image]Dalbir Kaur, sister of Indian national Sarabjit Singh on death row in Pakistan, second right, along with supporters of All India Youth Foundation takes an oath for securing his release in front of the India Gate war memorial at 11:11 am, in New Delhi, India, Friday, Nov. 11, 2011. A placard on left reads, “People’s Voice, Sarabjit.” (Gurinder Osan)
[Image]An Indonesian Muslim woman wears a Palestinian flag face mask during a solidarity protest for the Palestinian people in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. (Irwin Fedriansyah)
[Image]Demonstrators of a group “Occupy Rio” protest against Rio de Janeiro’s governor Sergio Cabral in downtown Rio de Janeiro November 10, 2011. The demonstration, inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement, seeks to address the corruption in the police and the problems with the health care system under the governance of Cabral. Cabral had originally organized a demonstration to rally against an oil reform amendment approved by the lower house of Congress. Reuters
[Image]Protesters from the communist-affiliated trade union PAME shout slogans during an anti-government protest in Athens November 10, 2011. Greece named former European Central Bank vice-president Lucas Papademos on Thursday to head a crisis government, ending a chaotic search for a leader to save the country from default, bankruptcy and an exit from the euro zone. Reuters
[Image]A demonstrator marches during a student protest against government plans to reform higher education at the main square in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of students marched in the country’s main cities despite a government proposal to withdraw a reform bill on higher education. (William Fernando Martinez)
[Image]People wave flags of Rio de Janeiro state during a protest against an oil reform amendment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011. Thousands of Brazilians are demonstrating against a plan that reduces revenue for oil-producing states and the federal government while increasing oil royalties for non-producing states. (Felipe Dana)
[Image]Christian fundamentalist holds a candle during a demonstration against Italian director Romeo Castellucci’s play “On the Concept of the Face, Regarding the Son of God” in Rennes, western France, Thursday Nov. 10, 2011. Christian fundamentalists gathered outside the cultural palace the Theatre National de Bretagne, (National Theatre of Brittany), to protest against the play which they claim is blasphemous. (David Vincent)
[Image]One of the students with peaceful attitude cleans the shield of a riot policemen that was stained with paint by more violent protesters, during a demonstration against an education reform bill at Bogota’s main square Plaza de Bolivar, on November 10, 2011. Thousands of students from more than 30 public universities took to the streets in Colombia to protest against proposed education reforms they fear will partially privatize higher education. The students have been on strike over the past month to protest a bill put forward by President Juan Manuel Santos that would require public universities to generate some of their own revenues. On Wednesday Santos offered to withdraw the draft and open a dialogue if the more than half a million students on strike lift their form of pressure. Getty
[Image]NOVEMBER 09: UCLA graduate student Cheryl Deutsch is arrested by Los Angeles Police Department officers after she and 10 other student protesters sat in circle in middle of the Westwood and Wilshire boulevard intersection as part of a protest of bank practices and rising fees at public universities on November 9, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. The protest organized by ReFund California was one of several planned at universities around the state. Getty
[Image]A woman shouts out as police officers move into the crowd of demonstrators and push people back during a student anti-cuts protest in London, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. Thousands of students marched through central London on Wednesday to protest cuts to public spending and a big increase in university tuition fees. Police said there were “a number of arrests for public order offenses” Wednesday, but the march was largely peaceful as demonstrators made their way through the city center.
[Image]A protester cries out as students and campaigners march through the streets of London in a protest against higher tuition fees and government cuts, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. (Sang Tan)
[Image]A lone protester stands outside the Scottsdale Plaza Resort to protest Republican Presidential candidate Herman Cain who was addressing the media Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Cain said Tuesday that he would not drop his bid for the Republicans’ presidential nomination in the face of decade-old allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (Charlie Leight)
[Image]Two members of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) who are covered from head to toe in green and blue bodypaint, as they hold a banner reading, “Save the Planet, Go Vegan,” at the Nanjing pedestrian street in Shanghai, China Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011. (Eugene Hoshiko)
[Image]Protestors from Occupy Philly participate in a ‘die in’ demonstration outside a PNC Bank branch in Philadelphia on Monday Nov. 7, 2011. The demonstration was conducted to draw attention to PNC Bank’s business practices. (Joseph Kaczmarek)
[Image]A Syrian woman, who lives in Cairo, reacts as others wave a giant Syrian revolution flag during an anti-Syrian President Bashar Assad demonstration at Tahrir Square, the focal point of Egyptian uprisings, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 to support protesters in Syria during the first day of Islamic Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice. (Amr Nabil)
[Image]An activist of the Ukrainian female rights organization “Femen” shows a placard demanding freedom for women, during a protest at the end of Pope Benedict XVI’s Angelus prayer in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. (Pier Paolo Cito)
[Image]Yemeni girls hold a giant Yemeni flag, left, as Syrians hold their revolution flag, right, during a protest against Yemeni and Syrian regimes at Tahrir Square, the focal point of Egyptian uprising, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 to support protesters in Yemen and Syria during the first day of Islamic Eid al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice. (Amr Nabil)
[Image]Amy Barnes protests as police move in to clear a downtown street during an Occupy Atlanta demonstration late Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 in Atlanta. (David Goldman)
[Image]In this Nov. 27, 2010 file photo, Susanna Camusso, leader of Italy’s largest labor confederation CGIL, arrives to deliver her speech during a demonstration to protest government policies regarding the economical crisis, in Rome. In an interview with The Associated Press Monday Nov. 7, 2011, Camusso is predicting 2012 will be a “terrifying” year for the economy even if beleaguered Premier Silvio Berlusconi leaves power soon.

Women Protest Worldwide Photos 2


[Image]Supporters of the Occupy London Stock Exchange protest take part in a mass meditation on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral in London, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. The senior St. Paul’s Cathedral priest who welcomed anti-capitalist demonstrators to camp outside the London landmark resigned Thursday, saying he feared moves to evict the protesters could end in violence.
[Image]Young South Africans who brought their frustration over poverty and joblessness to the streets Thursday, responding to a call by Julius Malema, the tough-talking youth leader of the governing African National Congress, reach the Johannesburg Stock Exchange Thursday Oct. 27, 2011. Malema took the lead in the “economic freedom march” that left downtown Johannesburg by foot to the Stock Exchange, then on foot and by bus about 40 miles (60 kilometers) north to Pretoria, the seat of government.
[Image]Jackie Hayes of Binghamton, N.Y., speaks supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement rally at the state Capitol in Albany, N.Y., Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. Several speakers criticized Gov. Andrew Cuomo for blocking a bill that would tax New Yorkers making over $1 million a year at a higher rate while cutting aid to schools, colleges and the poor. Cuomo, who was in New York City, had no immediate comment Thursday. (Hans Pennink)
[Image]Security guards detain an activist of the Ukrainian female rights organization “Femen”, during an action of nude protest in front of Kiev Zoo, Ukraine, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. Kiev zoo is a place that Femen’s activists compared to a concentration camp for those with fur and feathers. Hundreds of animals died at the zoo in recent years due to malnutrition, lack of medical care and abuse, and some suspect that corruption is at the heart of the problem. Femen calls for the 100-year-old zoo to be closed.
[Image]South Korea protesters stage a rally to protest against a free trade agreement (FTA) between South Korea and the United States near the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. The ruling Grand National Party and the government have set Friday, Oct. 28, as the deadline for ratifying the FTA bill. The letters read: ” Block the FTA between South Korea and the United States.” (Ahn Young-joon)
[Image]Supporters of the Occupy London Stock Exchange movement hold protest placards against bankers betting on food prices in financial markets outside a branch of the Goldman Sachs banking firm on Fleet Street in London, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. A police officer, second left, stands guarding the front door and one of the demonstrators, second right, is wearing a mask representing Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]A female Yemeni protestor burns veils during a demonstration demanding the resignation of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. The burning of the veil was not related to women’s rights or issues surrounding the Islamic veils – rather, the act of women burning their clothing is a symbolic Bedouin tribal gesture signifying an appeal for help to tribesmen, in this case to stop the attacks on women protesters. (Hani Mohammed)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters continue to increase their makeshift shelter at Zuccotti Park, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 in New York. While some businesses and residents are losing patience with the protesters in Zuccotti Park, organizers say they are receiving and storing heavy duty winter supplies to protest throughout the winter. (Bebeto Matthews)
[Image]Anti-corporate protesters pose for pictures as they stand next to tents of their protest camp outside St Paul’s Cathedral, in central London, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. As authorities around the world swoop in to evict anti-corporate protesters, London’s protest camp has become a tourist attraction _ one that has shut down the landmark St. Paul’s Cathedral.
[Image]University students carry mock coffins that read in Spanish “Here rests a fundamental right,” left, and “Colombian education, 1867-2012,” right, during a protest in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2011. Students are protesting education reforms planned by the government that propose private funding for public institutions. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters huddle together after police use tear gas to disperse a large crowd that gathered at 14th Street and Broadway in Oakland, Calif., Tuesday, October 25, 2011. Many demonstrators were arrested. (Darryl Bush)
[Image]A protestor yells as police seal off Woodruff Park to arrest those refusing to leave after Mayor Kasim Reed revoked his executive order allowing the Occupy Atlanta protestors to camp out in Woodruff Park Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 in Atlanta. (David Goldman)
[Image]North Korean defectors and South Korean civic members hold banners during a rally for North Korean refugees who were repatriated by the Chinese government, in front of the Chinese Embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011. The protesters called for China not to send North Korean refugees back to their country, saying those refugees might get executed. About 30 protesters participated at a rally. (Lee Jin-man)
[Image]Police officers detain an opposition demonstrator during an unsanctioned rally on Triumfalnaya Square in downtown Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. Several dozens people have been detained at an opposition rally in central Moscow where they were protesting against the lack of alternatives in the upcoming parliamentary and presidential elections. The posters, placed on a fence around a construction site, campaigns against violence to children by the national foundation to support children.
[Image]Swedish protester Rebecka Kullberg applies make-up beside a second protest campsite formed on Saturday by supporters of the Occupy London Stock Exchange group in Finsbury Square, London, Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. The Occupy protests over economic inequality have spread from a single camp in New York City to cities across the United States, Europe and Asia since mid-September. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, far left, faced off with Occupy Atlanta protesters during the mayor’s news conference at City Hall in Atlanta on Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. A protester holds a paper that reads Occupy Wall St. goes global as the mayor leaves. (Curtis Compton)
[Image]An exile Tibetan woman cries out as she scuffles with Indian police outside the United Nations Information Center at a protest seeking U.N. intervention in the Tibet issue in New Delhi, India, Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. The protest was held to express solidarity with the plight of people in Tibet who set themselves on fire in protest against Chinese rule. (Mustafa Quraishi)
[Image]Russian police officers detain a protester as she shouts anti-government slogans during an unsanctioned pro-democracy rally in front of Central Election commission office in downtown Moscow, Russia, Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. (Ivan Sekretarev)
[Image]President of Kashmir’s main opposition People’s Democratic Party (PDP) Mehbooba Mufti, center, addresses supporters during a protest in Srinagar, India, Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. Indian police in Srinagar on Monday stopped a protest march led by Mufti against the Jammu Kashmir state government’s alleged mass corruption. (Mukhtar Khan)
[Image]Supporters of Sri Lanka’s Marxist Party, known as Peoples Liberation Front, shout slogans during a protest against the rising cost of living in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. (Eranga Jayawardena)
[Image]Paramedics carry a wounded woman to an ambulance at Athens’ main Syntagma Square, during violent demonstrations, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011. A protester died during an anti-austerity demonstration that turned violent in the Greek capital Thursday, authorities said, hours before lawmakers were to vote on deeply unpopular new cutbacks demanded by creditors to keep Greece afloat. (Lefteris Pitarakis)
[Image]Two police officers hold a woman during clashes in Rome, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Italian police fired tear gas and water cannons as protesters in Rome turned a demonstration against corporate greed into a riot Saturday, smashing shop and bank windows, torching cars and hurling bottles. The protest in the Italian capital was part of Occupy Wall Street demonstrations against capitalism and austerity measures that went global Saturday, leading to dozens of marches and protests worldwide.
[Image]Dr. Angelina Shigeura, 31, left, and Dr. Amit Patel, 29, right, chant during a demonstration by doctors and medical professionals at the Occupy Wall Street protests in Zuccotti Park, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011, in New York. Doctors from the National Health Program and National Physicians Alliance have merged with the health care demonstrators within the Occupy Wall Street protests to form a group under the banner of “Healthcare for the 99%” and speak out against corporate greed in the medical industry. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Protesters march for a healthier and pollutant free environment during a demonstration called by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA), a Non-Government Organisation (NGO), in Durban on October 22, 2011. The protest initiated by the SDCEA comes after a fire broke out at the Engen Oil Refinery on October 11 and around one hundred school children have been hospitalised for smoke and toxic fume inhalation. Durban will host the 17 th Conference of Parties (COP) International Climate Change Conference in Durban in December 2011. Getty
[Image]Demonstrators cut a barbed wire fence as they march during a protest against the construction of a high-speed train line, known as TAV, which will link Turin in northern Italy to Lyon in France, near Chiomonte, north of Turin October 23, 2011. Reuters
[Image]Protesters shout as they take part in the ProAlt demonstration at the Old Town Square in Prague on October 22, 2011, to protest against the government planned budget cuts and social reforms. Over one thousand protesters, including Communist Union of Youth, trade unionists, members of organisations for people with disabilities and Czech Roma organisations, demonstrated in Prague. Getty
[Image]‘Occupy Melbourne’ demonstrators protest on October 22, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia. Protesters and riot police clashed in Melbourne again today after police, acting on a Melbourne City Council eviction order, attempted to break up the crowd of hundreds that had been positioned in City Square for a week. Getty
[Image]Demonstrators chant slogans against Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban during an anti-government demonstration in Budapest, Hungary, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011. Tens of thousands of Hungarians gathered to protest against Orban’s government at the 55th anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian revolution. (Bela Szandelszky)
[Image]Hungarian women listen to a speech during a demonstration attended by tens of thousands of people in Budapest on October 23, 2011 to protest against what they call the anti-democratic regime of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, on the anniversary of the 1956 revolution. Hungary’s uprising erupted on October 23, 1956 and was crushed by Soviet tanks on November 4, sealing the country’s fate as a satellite state of Moscow until the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. Getty
[Image]Kurdish protesters opposed to President Bashar Assad, shout slogans as they demonstrate against the Syrian regime, during a sit-in in front of the Syrian embassy, in Beirut, Lebanon, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011. The banner at left in Arabic reads: “down with the present gang. We want a civil state.” (Bilal Hussein)
[Image]A protester gets arrested during an Occupy Chicago march and protest in Grant Park in Chicago, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011. Demonstrators of the anti-Wall Street group Occupy Chicago stood their ground in the park and defied police orders to clear the area, prompting police to make more than a dozen arrests early Sunday. (Paul Beaty)
[Image]Protesters are arrested during an Occupy Chicago march and protest at Grant Park in Chicago Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011. Demonstrators of the anti-Wall Street group Occupy Chicago stood their ground in the park and defied police orders to clear the area, prompting police to make more than a dozen arrests early Sunday. (Paul Beaty)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protestors hold a meeting to discuss the use of funds for cleaning supplies proceeding a proposed cleanup of their camp in Zuccotti Park, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, in New York. The protests continue to draw large crowds and fresh participants as similar demonstrations are occuring around the world. (John Minchillo)
[Image]Demonstrators associated with the Occupy Wall Street march past New York City police officers towards a rally against police brutality at Union Square, Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011 in New York. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Activists vote during a meeting held amid tents in front of St Paul’s Cathedral in London October 22, 2011. London’s landmark St Paul’s Cathedral closed its doors on Friday because of hazards posed by hundreds of protesters encamped in front of it in a demonstration inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement. Reuters
[Image]Iranian women gather for a protest in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement outside the Swiss embassy which handles US interests in Tehran on October 22, 2011. Getty
[Image]A protestor looks from her tent during an occupation protest in Finsbury Square in the city of London on October 22, 2011. Saint Paul’s Cathedral remains closed for the first time in modern history because of anti-capitalist demonstrators camping outside the London landmark. More than 200 activists inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement have taken over the churchyard in front of the cathedral in the city’s financial district since last October 15 to protest against corporate greed and state cutbacks. Getty
[Image]Demonstrators associated with the Occupy Wall Street march through the streets of the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan during a rally against police brutality on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011. The demonstration marked Saturday’s observance of the “National Day of Protest to Stop Police Brutality, Repression and the Criminalization of a Generation.” AP
[Image]People take a picture of themselves as a souvenir at the location where Occupy Wall Street members are resting at Zuccotti park in New York October 22, 2011. Reuters
[Image]Protestors and members of Occupy Wall Street shout slogans next to NYPD officers, during an annual demonstration calling for a stop to police brutality in New York October 22, 2011. Reuters
[Image]The Council on American Islamic Relations New York Chapter (CAIR-NY) holds Friday prayers with Demonstrators with ‘Occupy Wall Street’ continue their protest at Zuccotti Park in New York on October 21, 2011. The encampment in the financial district of New York City is now in its second month. The demonstrators are protesting bank bailouts, foreclosures and high unemployment. Getty
[Image]A lady meditates on the outer wall of Zuccotti Park at the Occupy Wall Street Encampment in New York October 21, 2011. Reuters
[Image]Demonstrators with ‘Occupy Wall Street’ continue their protest at Zuccotti Park in New York on October 21, 2011. The encampment in the financial district of New York City is now in its second month. The demonstrators are protesting bank bailouts, foreclosures and high unemployment. Getty
[Image]Swiss Copts demonstrate against violence and injustice directed against their community in Egypt at the Place des Nations in front of the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, Oct. 21, 2011. (Martial Trezzini)
[Image]Demonstrators with ‘Occupy Wall Street’ continue their protest at Zuccotti Park in New York on October 21, 2011. The encampment in the financial district of New York City is now in its second month. The demonstrators are protesting bank bailouts, foreclosures and high unemployment. Getty
[Image]A woman sits outside the closed doors of St Paul’s Cathedral in the city of London on October 21, 2011. St Paul’s Cathedral said Friday it was closing its doors to the public for the first time in modern history because of anti-capitalist demonstrators camping outside the London landmark. More than 200 activists inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement have taken over the churchyard in front of the cathedral in the city’s financial district since last Saturday to protest against corporate greed and state cutbacks. Getty
[Image]Margie Levinthal holds a sign during a march from City Hall to the Wharton School of Business at Pennsylvania University Friday, Oct. 21, 2011 in Philadelphia. The demonstration at City Hall is one of many being held across the country in conjunction with the Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York. AP
[Image]Protesters display placards during a rally at the financial district of Makati city, east of Manila, Philippines Friday Oct. 21, 2011 in support of the new wave of protests around the globe known as “Occupy Wall Street.” The protesters singled out the country’s three big oil companies as “greedy for profit” as they raised anew this week the pump prices of gasoline and other oil products. (Bullit Marquez)
[Image]Marylou Wagner, left, and her grandchildren, Anthony Evenson, second from left, Phoebe Wagner, and Caitlin Wiesenborn, right, all from Fort Plain, N.Y. , demonstrate while supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement as protesters set up an encampment in Albany, N.Y. , Friday, Oct. 21, 2011. AP
[Image]Demonstrators with ‘Occupy Wall Street’ continue their protest at Zuccotti Park in New York on October 20, 2011. The encampment in the financial district of New York City is now in its second month. The demonstrators are protesting bank bailouts, foreclosures and high unemployment. Getty
[Image]Authorities, from left, front, Chile’s Education Minister Felipe Bulnes, Santiago University Rector Juan Manuel Zolezzi, and Chile’s Senator Ena Anglein von Baer, fourth from left, looks on as protesters carrying a banner that reads in Spanish “Plebiscite now,” stand on a table during a protest at the Chilean Senator headquarters in Santiago, Chile, Thursday Oct. 20, 2011. Students and other protesters interrupted a Senate committee meeting to demand a popular referendum on how to resolve Chile’s social problems, especially education. They left the building after receiving a promise from opposition lawmakers to present a proposal to hold a plebiscite.(Luis Hidalgo)
[Image]A student voluntarily leaves the Senate headquarters seized earlier by dozens of students in Santiago, Chile, Thursday Oct. 20, 2011. Students and other protesters interrupted a Senate committee meeting to demand a popular referendum on how to resolve Chile’s social problems, especially education. They left the building after receiving a promise from opposition lawmakers to present a proposal to hold a plebiscite.(Luis Hidalgo)
[Image]A Tibetan exile has her face covered with a Tibetan flag as she sits after a march to express solidarity with the plight of the people in Tibet, in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011. Tibetan spiritual leader The Dalai Lama on Wednesday fasted and led prayers in honor of nine Tibetans who set themselves on fire in apparent protest against China’s tight grip over Buddhist practices in Tibet. (Tsering Topgyal)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street participants carry on their occupation of Zuccotti Park near Wall Street in New York, October 18, 2011. Getty
[Image]A woman holds a sign outside of the Occupy Boston encampment as protester walks by with a box on his head in Boston, Massachusetts October 18, 2011. Occupy Boston is an extension of the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City. Reuters
[Image]A protester takes part in an Occupy Phoenix demonstration in Phoenix, Arizona October 17, 2011. Occupy Phoenix is part of the Occupy Wall Street movement that began in New York last month with a few people and expanded to protest marches and camps across the US and abroad. Reuters
[Image]In an Oct. 9, 2011 photo, Diane McEachern sits with her dogs Mr. Snickers, left, Seabiscuit, and Ruffian, right, on the tundra near Bethel, Alaska. McEachern wanted to participate in the Occupy Wall Street protests so she gathered her dogs, bundled up and went out to the tundra with a homemade sign that read “Occupy the Tundra.” The photo was posted on the Occupy Wall Street Facebook page and has since been shared thousands of times. AP
[Image]Protesting farmers and their supporters raise their clenched fists as they shout slogans during a rally in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday Oct. 18, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. The farmers called on to occupy the Supreme Court similar to the protest dubbed “Occupy Wall Street” to force them to act on their cases on the distribution of lands including Hacienda Luisita which is owned by the family of President Benigno Aquino III. AP
[Image]Students from the United Community daycare center of Brooklyn color in Zuccotti Park where Occupy Wall Street campaign demonstrators have been stationed near Wall Street in New York October 17, 2011. Reuters
[Image]A protestor hops in her sleeping bag as she camps outside St Paul’s Cathedral on October 17, 2011, in London’s financial district, during a third day of demonstrations against corporate greed and state spending cutbacks. The London encampment began on Saturday following a demonstration by about 2,000-3,000 people, as part of Europe-wide anti-capitalist protests inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement born in New York in September. Getty
[Image]Protesters shout slogans during a demonstration against the government and banks in Puerta del Sol square in solidarity action for the worldwide protest dubbed “Occupy the City” in Madrid on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The organizers of the Occupy Wall Street announced on their website that protesters will demonstrate in concert over 951 cities in 82 countries. (Arturo Rodriguez)
[Image]Protestors march near Toronto’s financial district on Saturday Oct. 15, 2011. The demonstration is one of many being held across the country recently in support of the ongoing Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York. (Chris Young)
[Image]A protestor blows her whistle during a demonstration in Barcelona Saturday Oct. 15, 2011. Demonstrators in cities all over the world are protesting against corporate power and the banking system. (Emilio Morenatti)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protestors prepare for a day of demonstrations throughout Manhattan by having their hair cut in Zuccotti Park, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011, in New York. As many as 1,000 protesters were marching Saturday morning to a Chase bank branch in the financial district, banging drums, blowing horns and carrying signs decrying corporate greed. Other demonstrations are planned around the city all day Saturday. (John Minchillo)

Occupy Oakland video: Riot police fire tear gas, flashbang grenades

Police have clashed with hundreds of demonstrators in the U.S. city of Oakland. It happened when hundreds marched to show their anger at police clearing an “Occupy Wall Street” camp. Officers shot several rounds of tear gas into the crowd, who were trying to reclaim their position within the city centre. Earlier on Tuesday, 85 people were arrested, after they refused to take down their tents as part of the nationwide movement against corporate greed.

Women Protest Worldwide Photos 3

Women Protest Worldwide Photos 3

 

[Image]Ellinda McKinney offers her message to police during the Occupy Denver protest, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011 in Denver. Occupy Denver protesters and law enforcement officers faced off on the steps of the state Capitol and Civic Center after protesters marched through downtown Denver for the fourth week in a row. (Craig F. Walker)
[Image]A woman performs as a widow during a protest against violence in Mexico City on October 28, 2011. More than 41,000 people have been killed in rising drug-related violence in Mexico since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed soldiers and federal police to take on organized crime. Getty
[Image]Demonstrators march towards the Treasury Department and the White House in Washington on October 29, 2011 during a protest organized by the Occupy DC movement to call for increased taxes on the rich, a so-called ‘Robin Hood tax.’ Getty
[Image]Israelis protest against the high costs of living in Tel Aviv, Israel, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011. According to police estimates over 30,000 participated in the Tel Aviv protest and thousands of others protested in Jerusalem on Saturday. A wave of social protests swept the country this summer as Israelis held mass protests to protest a wide range of social issues, especially high housing costs. (Maya Hasson)
[Image]A protester of the Occupy Berlin movement drinks champagne during a protest demonstration against the finance system in central Berlin, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011. (Markus Schreiber)
[Image]A demonstrator is seen during a protest organized by the Islamic Central Council of Switzerland (ICCS), on October 29, 2011 in Bern. More than 1000 persons attend the demonstration. The Islamic Central Council of Switzerland (ICCS), a conservative Muslim group was under criticism after chosen a symbol reminiscent of the Jewish Star of David with the word ‘Muslim’ framed by a yellow star. Getty
[Image]A woman holds a crucifix and a rosary as she demonstrates among around one thousand people called by ‘Civitas’ association, close to Christian fundamentalists on October 29, 2011 in Paris to protest against the play ‘Sur le concept du visage du fils de Dieu’ (On the Concept of the Face, Regarding the Son of God) by Italian Romeo Castellucci which is performed at the Paris Theatre de la Ville from October 20 to 30. Every evening, protesters demonstrate in front of the building to denounce the’ of the play which they found insulting. Getty
[Image]Occupy Nashville protesters, from the left, Megan Riges, Lauren Plummer and Lindsey Krinks, celebrate Friday, Oct. 28, 2011, after they were released by police after being arrested overnight on Legislative Plaza in downtown Nashville, Tenn. Twenty-nine Wall Street protesters in Nashville have been issued misdemeanor citations for criminal trespassing after being arrested by state troopers overnight. (John Partipilo)
[Image]Protesters affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street Movement are seen at the Tennessee Capitol, Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. Tennessee’s safety commissioner says Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s office approved a pre-dawn roundup of Wall Street protesters from the state Capitol grounds. Twenty-nine people were arrested, but a night judge refused to sign warrants because the policy had only been in effect since the previous afternoon. (Erik Schelzig)
[Image]A dressed woman attends a protest in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2011. The protest was against education reforms planned by the government that propose private funding for public institutions. (Fernando Vergara)
[Image]Activists of Femen, a Ukrainian women movement, wearing masks representing the slaughtered animals, shout slogans and hold placards reading ‘Zoomorgue’, ‘Slaughten house’, ‘Zooghetto’ as they stage a topless protest on a roof at the entrance of the zoo in Kiev on October 27, 2011. They rally against, as they say, the intolerable living conditions for animals in the zoo. Every year the Zoo is claiming the lives of hundreds of rare and exotic animals, that die a horrific death of hunger, cold or disease, as they report to AFP. The FEMEN movement demands that the Ukrainian authorities close the Kievs ZooMorgue as they call it. Getty
[Image]Supporters of Pakistan Muslim League-N (PML-N) attend a rally against Pakistan’s President Asif Ali Zardari in Lahore on October 28, 2011. More than 30,000 supporters of Pakistan’s main opposition party took to the streets in a protest rally on October 28, burning an effigy of President Asif Ali Zardari and demanding that he quit. The Pakistan Muslim League-N (PML-N) called the rally in Lahore to exploit talk of early elections in its political heartland, where it controls the Punjab provincial government despite being in opposition at national level. Getty
[Image]Supporters of Pakistani politician Imran Khan and chief of Tehreek-e-Insaf (Movement for Justice) party, carry placards as they march during protest rally in Islamabad on October 28, 2011 against US drone attacks in Pakistani tribal region. Khan staged a rally along with tribal elders in Islamabad against the continued US drone attacks in tribal areas which they said were killing hundreds of innocent people. Nearly 60 US drone strikes have been reported in Pakistan so far this year, dozens of them since Navy SEALs killed Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in the garrison city of Abbottabad, close to the capital Islamabad, on May 2. Getty
[Image]Protesters throw mud at a caricature of President Benigno Aquino III during a protest Friday Oct. 28, 2011 in Manila, Philippines against the President’s alleged continued support for big corporations including the big three oil companies in the country. The protest, part of the nationwide “Women’s Day of Protest,” was held following another round of oil price hike implemented late last week. (Bullit Marquez)
[Image]Relatives of missing Kashmiri youth participate in a protest demonstration organized by the Association of Parents of Disappeared Persons (APDP) in Srinagar, India, Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. According to APDP some 8,000-10,000 people have gone missing since the beginning of the Kashmir conflict in 1989, after being arrested by Indian security forces and other security agencies. (Dar Yasin)
[Image]Anti-austerity protesters shout slogans before a scheduled military parade in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki, Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. Thousands of anti-austerity protesters in the city forced the cancellation of Friday’s annual military parade commemorating Greece’s entry into World War II. The demonstrators heckled Greek President Karolos Papoulias and other attending officials, calling Papoulias a traitor. (Nikolas Giakoumidis)
[Image]Campaigners on the ‘Occupy London Stock Exchange’ protest encampment outside St Paul’s Cathedral on October 28, 2011 in London, England. St Paul’s Cathedral is due to reopen after being closed due to the adjacent ‘Occupy London Stock Exchange’ protest against the global financial system which has been in place for almost two weeks. Getty
[Image]Filipino Muslims hold their Friday prayers near the Presidential Palace during a “Prayer-for-Peace” rally Friday Oct. 28, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. The prayer protest was held to call for peace following the military’s launching of air strikes and military operations after one of the worst clashes in three years with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) this month killed 26 soldiers, three policemen and an undetermined number of Muslim rebels. Close to 30,000 civilians have been displaced in the ongoing operation, officials said. AP
[Image]A man consoles a distressed woman as she weeps at a protest during the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Perth, Australia, Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. Queen Elizabeth II opened CHOGM Friday with more than 50 commonwealth nations’ leaders attending the three-day forum to discuss global and Commonwealth issues and collective policies and initiatives. AP
[Image]Members of the Mexican Huichole community take part in a protest against Canadian mining projects in Mexico City on October 27, 2011. Huicholes from Durango, Nayarit and Jalisco marched along Reforma avenue towards the presidential palace to demand the end of the Canadian exploitation of silver in Cerro del Quemado, San Luis Potosi, arguing it affects nature and their sacred path. Getty
[Image]A member of the Mexican Huichole community takes part in a protest against Canadian mining projects in Mexico City on October 27, 2011. Huicholes from Durango, Nayarit and Jalisco marched along Reforma avenue towards the presidential palace to demand the end of the Canadian exploitation of silver in Cerro del Quemado, San Luis Potosi, arguing it affects nature and their sacred path. Getty
[Image]A resident speaks with journalists as they protest outside the refinery compound of Italian oil company Eni at the town of Tazarka, about 70 km (43.5 miles) south-east of capital Tunis October 27, 2011. The protesters say that the refinery owners have not honoured their commitments to provide the local community with jobs and investments in infrastructure. Message written in Arabic reads “protest”. Reuters
[Image]People march during a protest in Zhili town, Huzhou city, Zhejiang province October 27, 2011. Hundreds of people have clashed with police and smashed public property in China’s eastern Zhejiang province after a dispute between tax authorities and a local shop owner snowballed into protests, a government-run news site said. Reuters
[Image]People watch as riot police walk along the central square during a protest in Zhili town, Huzhou city, Zhejiang province October 27, 2011. Hundreds of people have clashed with police and smashed public property in China’s eastern Zhejiang province after a dispute between tax authorities and a local shop owner snowballed into protests, a government-run news site said. Reuters
[Image]A Christian activist holds a placard reading “No fraternity without respect of the other” as she prays during a demonstration, in Paris, Thursday Oct. 27, 2011, in front of the Theatre de la ville, where the Italian director Romeo Castellucci’s play “On the Concept of the Face, Regarding the Son of God” is being performed. Christian fundamentalists protest against the play featuring the face of Christ drizzled with fake excrement. (Thibault Camus)
[Image]About 1300 hundred people attend a candlelight vigil for Scott Olsen on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. During an Occupy Oakland protest Tuesday night, a projectile apparently fired by police struck the Iraq veteran in the head leaving him in critical condition with a fractured skull. (Noah Berger)
[Image]Participants of the Occupy Wall Street movement, right, talk to pedestrians trying to walk past their tent at the encampment at Zuccotti Park, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011 in New York. The protests, which started on Sept. 17 with a few dozen demonstrators near Wall Street, as grown into a nationwide and international movement. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]Demonstrators supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement march in the hallways during a rally inside the state Capitol in Albany, N.Y., Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. Several speakers criticized Gov. Andrew Cuomo for blocking a bill that would tax New Yorkers making over $1 million a year at a higher rate while cutting aid to schools, colleges and the poor. Cuomo, who was in New York City, had no immediate comment Thursday. (Hans Pennink)
[Image]Police officers look at the Occupy London Stock Exchange camp as they stand on the steps outside St Paul’s Cathedral in London, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011. St. Paul’s Cathedral says it will reopen Friday, a week after is shut its doors because of an anti-capitalist protest camp outside. It will reopen to tourists on Saturday. Protesters have been camped outside the building since Oct. 15. Days later, cathedral officials shut the building to the public.
[Image]Demonstrators hold cutouts representing women during a protest in front of the National Assembly building during a protest to demand the return of the therapeutic abortion law, in Managua, Nicaragua, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2011. The therapeutic abortion law, which allows the termination of a pregnancy to save a mother’s life, was repealed by the legislature in 2006, handing down eight-year prison sentences to those who terminated risky pregnancies. (Esteban Felix)
[Image]In this Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011 file photo demonstrators burn copies of emergency tax notices during a protest by the Communist-backed labor union. Groups of lawyers, trade unions and campaigners have tried to derail government efforts to collect new taxes, or to suspend tens of thousands of civil servants on partial pay. State buildings have been occupied, municipalities have stalled in delivering emergency notices ordering strikers back to work.
[Image]Two activists of the Femen Movement from Ukraine protest during a press conference ‘Euro 2012: Corruption and Prostitution’ organised in the Culture Center Nowy Wspanialy Swiat, in Warsaw, Poland, on September 15, 2011. The members of the Femen Movement were presented during the conference as Blyadek and Blyadko – alternative mascots of Euro 2012, who like sex, football and alcohol. FEMEN activists want to demostrate the ‘dark side’ of Ukraine’s preparation for Euro 2012 and expose the corrupt schemes associated with the football championships. Getty

	

Occupy Wall Street-Oakland Photos, 25 October 2011, Day 39

39

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters help a man injured after police used tear gas to disperse a large crowd of protesters at 14th Street and Broadway in Oakland, Calif., Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011. (Darryl Bush)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters huddle together after police use tear gas to disperse a large crowd that gathered at 14th Street and Broadway in Oakland, Calif., Tuesday, October 25, 2011. Many demonstrators were arrested. (Darryl Bush)
[Image]An Occupy Wall Street protester stands with a banner after police use tear gas to disperse a large crowd that gathered at 14th Street and Broadway in Oakland, Calif., Tuesday, October 25, 2011. Scores of demonstrators were arrested. (Darryl Bush)
[Image]Oakland police fire tear gas as they prepare to move in to Frank Ogawa Plaza to disperse Occupy Oakland protesters on Tuesday. Oct. 25, 2011 in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]Police prepare to enter Occupy Oakland’s City Hall encampment on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]Oakland Occupy protestors form a line opposing the police at the Frank Ogawa Plaza on Tuesday. Oct. 25, 2011 in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]Oakland police search tents in Frank Ogawa Plaza as they disperse Occupy Oakland protesters on Tuesday. Oct. 25, 2011 in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]Oakland police search tents in Frank Ogawa Plaza as they disperse Occupy Oakland protesters on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 in Oakland, Calif. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]An Occupy Oakland protester waits in his tent as police clear the group’s Snow Park encampment on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]Unidentified protesters link arms as police advance on their City Hall encampment on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]An Occupy Oakland camper carries belonging in his teeth as he’s arrested from the group’s city hall encampment on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Jane Tyska)
[Image]The Oakland Occupy encampment at Frank Ogawa Plaza after Oakland Police disbanded the tent community leaving debris strewn throughout the plaza on Tuesday. Oct. 25, 2011 in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Noah Berger)
[Image]Tents and debris are seen on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Police in riot gear began clearing anti-Wall Street protesters on Tuesday morning from the plaza in front of Oakland’s City Hall where they have been camped out for about two weeks. City officials had originally been supportive of the protesters, but the city later warned the protesters that they were breaking the law and could not stay in the encampment overnight. (Noah Berger)
[Image]An Oakland police officer in riot gear stands guard over Frank H. Ogawa plaza Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011, in Oakland, Calif. Occupy Oakland protestors were evicted from the plaza early this morning. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
[Image]

Occupy Wall Street-London-Chicago-NYC Photos, 17 October 2011, Day 31

Frankfurt

[Image]Demonstrators chat while warming their hands on a makeshift fire in the park near the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, central Germany, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Thousands of people demonstrated against corporate greed in cities across Europe on Saturday, along with much smaller protests in cities across the U.S. Banners on tent read right: ‘WTF where is freedom?’ and at left : ‘A good life instead of profit’. (Thomas Lohnes)

Toronto

[Image]A protester stands outside the Toronto Stock Exchange in the city’s financial district on Monday Oct. 17, 2011 as the Occupy Bay Street protest continues into it’s third day. (Chris Young)

New York City

[Image]A participant who asked not to identified and a dog begin the day along with others at the Occupy Wall Street protests at Zuccotti Park in New York Monday, Oct. 17, 2011 as the protest enters it’s 30th day. (Craig Ruttle)

Occupy Wall Street – Diversity

[Image][Published October 17, 2011.] In this Oct. 14, 2011 photo, demonstrators affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street protests stand in line to be served lunch at Zuccotti Park in New York. The outcry against the nation’s financial institutions that has swept the country in recent weeks has crossed many boundaries, including class, gender and age. But a stubborn hurdle in many cities has been a lack of racial inclusion, something noted by organizers and participants alike. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image][Published October 17, 2011.] In this Oct. 14, 2011 photo, Nicole Carty, 23, from Atlanta, confers with fellow organizing colleagues as she prepares to conduct a general assembly meeting for participants of Zuccotti Park’s Occupy Wall Street encampment, in New York. She is considered a core facilitator who organizes activities at the encampment. The outcry against the nation’s financial institutions that has swept the country in recent weeks has crossed many boundaries, including class, gender and age. But a stubborn hurdle But a stubborn hurdle in many cities has been a lack of racial inclusion, something noted by organizers and participants alike.
[Image][Published October 17, 2011.] In this Oct. 15, 2011 photo, a woman participates in an Occupy Atlanta protest at the state Capitol, in Atlanta. The outcry against the nation’s financial institutions that has swept the country in recent weeks has crossed many boundaries, including class, gender and age. But a stubborn hurdle in many cities has been a lack of racial inclusion, something noted by organizers and participants alike. (Erik S. Lesser)

Amsterdam

[Image]Two security guards stand at the entrance to the NYSE Euronext stock exchange in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Monday Oct. 17, 2011, plastered with slogans in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Hundreds of thousands demonstrated against corporate greed in cities across Europe on Saturday, along with much smaller protests in cities across the U.S. (Peter Dejong)

London

[Image]A protest banner put up by protesters from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group hangs besides tents pitched outside St Paul’s Cathedral before sunrise, as they continue their demonstration that started there on Saturday near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]A protester from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group puts up a notice on an information point on the side of St Paul’s Cathedral as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]A masked protester from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group offers passing business people ‘Free Hugs’ as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]A protester from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group puts the finishing touches to a placard stating “London Hug Exchange”, as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]Police officers chat to protesters beside tents put up by supporters of the Occupy London Stock Exchange group as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]Protesters begin to rise from sleep before sunrise beside tents put up by supporters of the Occupy London Stock Exchange group, as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]Business people walk past tents put up by protesters from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham)
[Image]A businessman walks past tents put up by protesters from the Occupy London Stock Exchange group as they continue their demonstration that started on Saturday outside St Paul’s Cathedral, near the London Stock Exchange in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe have taken part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Matt Dunham) [Note “Fire Access Point” and safety corridors, a sign of capable oversight.]

Chicago

[Image]In this photo taken Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011, protesters take part in a march and rally at Michigan and Congress in Chicago for the Global Day of Occupation. About 2,000 people participated Saturday in an Occupy Chicago demonstration, and about 500 pitched tents in Congress Plaza that evening. Chicago police say the protesters were told to remove their tents and leave the park when it closed at 11 p.m. When they didn’t, police began cutting down the tents and making arrests. (Chicago Sun Times)

New York City

[Image]Hip Hop Mogul Russell Simmons, right, listens to a protester at the camp for the Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011. (David Karp) [The cardboard, twine and rain-sheet shelter deftly by-passes Brookfield Properties’ forbidden tents and tarps.]
[Image]A group of activists hold a strategy meeting in a storage space for supplies supporting the camp of Occupy Wall Street protesters, Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011, in New York. The goods are housed in an unused space donated by the United Federation of Teachers. (David Karp) [From a base in Liberty Park there are thousands of spaces available for sharing openly and not so openly in New York City and worldwide cities as “Wall Street” is widely dispersed openly and secretly.]

Unveiled – Occupy Wall Street-Global Photos, 15 October 2011, Day 29

Part 2


Italy

[Image]Protesters hurl objects at police in Rome, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Protesters in Rome smashed shop windows and torched cars as violence broke out during a demonstration in the Italian capital, part of worldwide protests against corporate greed and austerity measures. The “Occupy Wall Street” protests, that began in Canada and spread to cities across the U.S., moved Saturday to Asia and Europe, linking up with anti-austerity demonstrations that have raged across the debt-ridden continent for months.

Belgium

[Image]Two protesters spray graffiti at a bank, during a march in Brussels, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The protest in the Belgian capital was part of Occupy Wall Street demonstrations against capitalism and austerity measures that went global Saturday, leading to dozens of marches and protests worldwide. (Yves Logghe)

France

[Image]A protestor holds a placard during an anti-capitalist demonstration, in Paris, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe took part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. The placard reads: “Financial market dictatorship, enough”(Thibault Camus)

Romania

[Image]A man wears an anti-establishment mask during the “Occupy Bucharest” protest in Bucharest, Romania, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The protest, meant as a part of worldwide protests “Occupy Wall Street” against corporate greed and austerity measures, was joined by few people who at times fought among themselves, trying to clarify their vague requests, aimed at linking up with anti-austerity demonstrations that have raged across the debt-ridden continent for months.(Vadim Ghirda)

Great Britain

[Image]Julian Assange, center, takes part in the Occupy London Stock Exchange demonstration in London Saturday Oct, 15, 2011. Protesters in cities across Europe take part in rallies inspired by the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations in the United States, expressing their frustration at social inequality and corporate greed. (Elizabeth Dalziel)

Canada

Montreal[Image]Frederic Carmel sits next to his tent in Montreal’s financial district on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The demonstration is one of many being held across the country recently in support of the ongoing Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York. (Graham Hughes)
Toronto[Image]Protestors gather in Toronto’s financial district for the Occupy Bay Street demonstration on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011 in Toronto. The demonstration is one of many being held across the country recently in support of the ongoing Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York. (Chris Young)

Columbia, SC

[Image]Diane Kuhn, of West Columbia, S.C. holds a protest sign calling for the prosecution of financial criminals during the Occupy Columbia demonstration at the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C., Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. (Brett Flashnick)

Washington, DC

[Image]Demonstrators hold banners during the Jobs at Justice rally at Washington Monument in Washington on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. (Jose Luis Magana)

Part 1


Germany

[Image]Protestors march through the streets of Berlin during a demonstration to support the ‘ Occupy Wall Street’ -movement Saturday Oct. 15, 2011. Protestors gathered at many major European cities Saturday to join in demonstrations against corruption, capitalism and austerity measures. (Maja Hitij)

Australia

[Image]Protesters gather in front of the Reserve Bank of Australia in central Sydney, Australia, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The organizer of the Occupy Wall Street announced on their website that protesters will demonstrate in concert over 951 cities in 82 countries. (Rick Rycroft)

Bosnia

[Image]Bosnian people carrying banners with the text “For a class war against dictatorship of capitalism”, top, and “What did bank do? The bank bankrupted!”, bottom banner, during a protest march, in the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. Hundreds marched down the main streets of Bosnian cities carrying banners that call for the end of alleged worldwide “Capitalistic Dictatorship”. (Amel Emric)

Harrisburg, PA

[Image]Protesters gather at the Pennsylvania Capitol Saturday, Oct 15, 2011 in Harrisburg, Pa. The demonstration is one of many being held across the country recently in support of the ongoing Occupy Wall Street demonstration in New York. (Bradley C Bower)

Japan

[Image]Participants march through Tokyo’s Kasumigaseki administrative district during “Occupy Tokyo” protest Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The demonstration was held in support of the Occupy Wall Street protest against corporate power. (Itsuo Inouye)

Netherlands

[Image]Children watch as protestors prepare placards outside the NYSE Euronext stock exchange in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Saturday Oct. 15, 2011, during a demonstration in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Demonstrators in hundreds of cities all over the world protested against corporate power and the banking system. (Peter Dejong)

Philippines

[Image]Protesters shout slogans as they march towards the U.S. embassy in solidarity action for the U.S. protest dubbed “Occupy Wall Street” Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011 in Manila, Philippines. (Pat Roque)

South Korea

[Image]South Korean protesters stage an “Occupy Seoul” rally in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The demonstration was held in support of the “Occupy Wall Street” protest against corporate power. The Korean letters read: “Tax the Rich 1%, Welfare for the 99%.” (Ahn Young-joon)

Sweden

[Image]Protesters take part in the “Occupy central” protest in Stockholm, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011, as protesters worldwide demonstrated against bankers and politicians they accuse of ruining global economies through greed. (Maja Suslin)

Switzerland

[Image]People demonstrate on the Place des Nations in front of the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday Oct. 15, 2011. Protestors gathered at many major European cities Saturday to join in demonstrations against corporate greed and inequality. (Martial Trezzini)
[Image]Young people demonstrate in the financial district of Zurich, Switzerland, Saturday Oct. 15, 2011. The organizer of the Occupy Wall Street movement announced on their website that protesters will demonstrate in over 951 cities in 82 countries. (Ennio Leanza)

Taiwan

[Image]Activists hold magazines titled “Socialist” during a protest named “Occupy Taipei” organized by Taiwanese net friends in front of the Taipei 101 building in Taipei, Taiwan, Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011. The rally was a part of Saturday’s worldwide activities held in support of the Occupy Wall Street protest against corporate power. (Chiang Ying-ying)

Occupy Wall Street-USA Photos, 8 October 2011, Day 22

Washington DC

[Image]Demonstrators who camped out at Freedom Plaza wake up for the third day of demonstrations Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]One demonstrator helps another flush her eyes with water after after police pepper-sprayed a group of protestors, who were trying to get into the National Air and Space Museum in Washington Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]Pepper-sprayed demonstrators sit and lie on the ground outside the entrance to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington after a group of protestors tryed to get into the museum Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]Demonstrators react at the entrance of the National Air and Space Museum in Washington after police pepper-sprayed a group of protestors trying to get into the museum Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]A demonstrator lies on the ground at an entrance to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington after police pepper-sprayed a group of protestors trying to get into the museum Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]Demonstrators march through the streets of Washington Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of the Occupy DC activities in the nation’s capital. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]Demonstrators protest at Freedom Plaza in Washington on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, on day three of demonstrations in Washington as part of Occupy DC activities. (Jose Luis Magana)
[Image]Demonstrators carrying a variety of signs march through the streets of Washington Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, as part of Occupy DC activities in the nation’s capital. (Jose Luis Magana)

Boston

[Image]Matthew Gember, of Chicago, makes a point as Occupy Boston demonstrators protest on the plaza in front of the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. (Michael Dwyer)
[Image]Occupy Boston protesters demonstrate on the plaza in front of the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. (Michael Dwyer)
[Image]Courtney Haskell, lower left, of North Reading, Mass., demonstrates on the plaza in front of the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston as police reflected in a motorcycle mirror look on, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. (Michael Dwyer)

Casper

[Image]Marilyn Mullen stands in support for the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ movement during the Casper, Wyo. rally on Center Street Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 Over 50 people held signs and American flags in support of the demonstration which is trying to achieve change in government tax law, asking the wealthy to pay an equal percentage of taxes that the working class pays. (Tim Kupsick)

Cincinnati

[Image]With a statue of Abraham Lincoln at center right, protesters begin their march through downtown Cincinnati during the Occupy Cincinnati protest, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (David Kohl)
[Image]Protesters march through downtown Cincinnati for the Occupy Cincinnati protest on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (David Kohl)

Indianapolis

[Image]Tamra Bell 52, back right, and her four children Stephanie Stayton, 28, left front, Robert 21, left back, and Courtney 23, attend the Occupy Indy protest in Indianapolis on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. Tamra’s husband has been unemployed for two years and suffers from health problems. His unemployment will soon run out and Bell is on the verge of losing the home. The small income her son Robert brings in has helped the family to stay in their home so far. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Michelle Pemberton)
[Image]More than a thousand demonstrators gather in Veteran’s Plaza in Indianapolis on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 for Occupy Indy, a protest against everything from bank foreclosures and corporate influence in politics to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and unemployment. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Michelle Pemberton)
[Image]A demonstrator holds a sign as more than a thousand gather in Veteran’s Plaza in Indianapolis on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 for Occupy Indy, a protest against everything from bank foreclosures and corporate influence in politics to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and unemployment. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Michelle Pemberton)
[Image]More than a thousand protesters march through Indianapolis on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 for Occupy Indy, a protest against everything from bank foreclosures and corporate influence in politics to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and unemployment. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Michelle Pemberton)

New York

[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters gather in Washington Square Park, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 in New York. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Henny Ray Abrams)
[Image]Demonstrators holding signs gather at the Occupy Wall Street rally in New York on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. (Caleb Jones)
[Image]Protesters with Occupy Wall Street march from Zuccotti Park to Washington Square Park in New York on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011. The Occupy Wall Street movement started in New York City last month and is spreading to other parts of the country. (Henny Ray Abrams)
[Image]Hundreds of skateboarders heading down Broadway toward OWS from West 89th Street and Broadway, October 8, 2011. (Cryptome)
[Image]In this Friday, Oct. 7, 2011 photo, Cherie Walters, 58, from Mount Clemens, Mich., poses for a photograph, in New York. Walters, who has participated in Occupy Wall Street protests, is wearing the shirt she wore to two of the protests. (Tina Fineberg)

Philadelphia

[Image]People hold signs and are reflected in a bus stop pane, as they walk in the street during their march from City Hall to the Independence National Historical Park Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, in Philadelphia. Organizers of what is being called Occupy Philadelphia say the demonstration is meant to be a stand against corporate greed. (Alex Brandon)
[Image]People hold signs as they walk in the street during their march from City Hall to the Independence National Historical Park Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 in Philadelphia. Organizers of what is being called Occupy Philadelphia say the demonstration is meant to be a stand against corporate greed. (Alex Brandon)

	

TOP-SECRET – Net Worth by John Galt OWS

ia: http://twitter.com/#!/WeRallJohnGalt John Galt (“John Galt” is an Ayn Rand fictional hero.)

These appeared as Occupy Wall Street dissent, most at Twitter #ows. Repetition of entries deliberate.

Cryptome Occupy Wall Street photo and video series: http://cryptome.org/ows-series.htm

Cryptome Protest Photos Series: http://cryptome.org/protest-series.htm


Bill Maher, defender of poor, atheist, net worth $23M #p2

5 hours ago


Mark Ruffalo, avenger to poor, speaker at #OWS today, net worth $10M #p2 #ows

6 hours ago


Tim Robbins, boy toy to Susan Sarandon, net worth $45M. #p2 #ows

6 hours ago


Susan Sarandon, warrior against Rich, friend to #OWS, net worth $50M #p2 #ows

6 hours ago


John Goodman, Roseannes’s TV hubby, portraying a “normal guy”, built a net worth of $65M. He owns four homes over 5,000 SF each. #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


CNN’s Anderson Cooper. 360. Investigating corruption & greed. Net worth $110M. Makes $11M per year. #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Harry “jobs” Reid, union friend, defender of poor, net worth $5M #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Nancy Pelosi, Joan D’Arc of working class, net worth $36M #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Jimmy Carter, friend to Castro, champion of global poor, net worth $5M #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Etta James net worth $16M #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Lady Gaga, champion of the oppressed, net worth $110M. In process of buying castle in Scotland. Born that way. #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Jane Fonda, left heroine, net worth $120M. Owns 5 homes over 4,000 square feet each. How big’s your house? #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Linda Rondstat, main squeeze of Gov Brown, net worth $115M. #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


CA Gov Jerry Brown net worth $4M #p2 #ows

7 hours ago


Jimmy Buffet, palm tree sage of working class, net worth $400M. Are we seeing a trend here progs? Good 4 Jimmy. #p2 #ows

8 hours ago


Bob Marley net worth $130M. Good for him. Love Marley. #p21 #ows

8 hours ago


Chelsea Clinton net worth $5M #p2 #ows

8 hours ago


Hillary Clinton net worth $22M #p2 #ows

8 hours ago


Bill Clinton net worth $80M #p2 #ows

8 hours ago


Alec Baldwin net worth $65M. Gets $300K per episode. Learning yet progs? #p2 #ows #tcot

8 hours ago


Al Gore net worth $100M. No carbon offset profits included. #p2 #owl

8 hours ago


Michael Moore net worth $80M. Hero of the poor. #OWS #p2

8 hours ago


Ron Paul net worth $5M #OWS

8 hours ago


John Lennon net worth $800M. Getting the picture progs? You’re pawns. GOP wants YOU to succeed. #OWS #p2 #tcot

9 hours ago


George W Bush, greatest American President, scourge of poor, worth $54M LESS than Roseanne, 3M less than Maher #p2 #ows #tcot

9 hours ago


Warren Buffet, Prog darling, worth $39 Billion. #p2 #ows

9 hours ago


Maxine Waters. Lotta Wall Street dividends. #ows #p2 pfds.opensecrets.org/N00006690_2010…

9 hours ago


Arrianna Hufington (Huffington Post) net worth is $35M. And she was born in Greece LOL. #p2 #ows #tcot

9 hours ago


Figured out why @billmaher is so angry. He’s only worth $23M. Roseanne’s worth $80M. Even I think THAT’s unfair #ows #p2 #tcot

9 hours ago


Fidel Castro, socialist hero, net worth $900M. Good money in being King. Understand Obama’s motives now. #OWS #p2

10 hours ago


Hugo Chavez net worth is $1Billion #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Finally figured out why Maher is angry all the time. He’s only worth $23M while Roseanne’s worth $80M. Even I think that’s unfair #ows

10 hours ago


Jesse Jackson net worth is $10M #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Al Sharpton is only worth $5M #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Morgan Freeman has a net worth of $90M #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Richard Trumka made $265K in 2010, 3 times the median wage of rank & file. His net worth is not available (shock). #OWS #p2

10 hours ago


Democrat Senator Herb Kohl from Wisconsin net worth $243M #OWS #p2

10 hours ago


Champions of the Poor: Stewart, Maher, Barr, Olbermann, Maddow, Sanders, Schultz, Penn. Combined net worth: $1.2 Billion. #ows #p2

10 hours ago


Bill Maher’s net worth is $23M. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Jon Stewart’s net worth is also $80M. Yearly salary is $15M #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Roseanne Barr’s net worth is $80M. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Alan Colmes net worth is only $12M. Salary just $2M per year. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Barack Obama’s net worth is $10.5M. He makes $400K per year. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Keith Olbermann net worth is $35M. Yearly salary was $10M. Now probably $50K. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Senator Bernie Sanders net worth $750M. One of richest in Congress. #ows #p2

10 hours ago


Rachel Maddow’s net worth is $12.5M #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Michael Moore net worth is $50M #OWS #p2 Moore personally reaped $80M from Fahrenheit 911

10 hours ago


MSNBC’s Ed Schultz net worth is $11.5M. #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Howard Schultz (CEO Starbucks) net worth $1.3 Billion (no typo). Enjoy your coffee #ows #p2

10 hours ago


Domino’s pizza CEO Patrick Doyle made $5.5M in 2010. 164 times the median salary of his workers. Enjoy your pizza #p2 #ows

10 hours ago


Bob Marley. Worth $137M. Sweet fruit indeed #ows

14 hours ago


Sean Penn net worth is $150M. Now I know why he loves Chavez. Envy. #p2 #ows

15 hours ago


Finally figured out why Maher is angry all the time. He’s only worth $23M while Roseanne’s worth $80M. Even I think that’s unfair #OWS

15 hours ago


Fidel Castro net worth $900M #OWS #p2

15 hours ago


Hugo Chavez net worth is $1Billion #p2 #OWS

15 hours ago


Roseanne, $80M superwoman, condemns the rich at #OWS #p2

15 hours ago


Keith Olbermann, $35M man, protests the rich on #OWS #p2

15 hours ago


Richard Trumka made $265K in 2010, 3 times the median wage of rank & file. His net worth is not available (shock). #OWS #p2

15 hours ago


Democrat Senator Herb Kohl from Wisconsin net worth $243M #OWS #p2

16 hours ago


Senator Bernie Sanders net worth $750M. One of richest in Congress. #ows p2

16 hours ago


Matt Damon net worth is $65M. Earns about $24M per year now. #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Domino’s pizza CEO Patrick Doyle made $5.5M in 2010. 164 times the median salary of his workers. Enjoy your pizza #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Howard Schultz (CEO Starbucks) net worth $1.3 Billion (no typo). Enjoy your coffee #ows #p2

16 hours ago


MSNBC’s Ed Schultz net worth is $11.5M. #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Obama rails against millionaires (defined as $250K) while holding $15M in worth. Shouldn’t he be giving up $14.1M to keep face? #p2

16 hours ago


Nelson Mandela net worth is $15M #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Bob Marley estate estimated net worth is $130M #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Jimi Hendrix estate net worth of $175M #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Morgan Freeman has a net worth of $90M #p2 #ows

16 hours ago


Michael Moore net worth is $50M #OWS #p2 Moore personally reaped #80M from Fahrenheit 911

16 hours ago


Louis Farrakhan net worth is $3M #OWS #p2

16 hours ago


Joe Biden net worth is $500K. Really? sad. I’m worth more than Joe, in many ways. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Keith Olbermann net worth is $35M. Yearly salary was $10M. Now probably $50K. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Al Sharpton is only worth $5M #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Jesse Jackson net worth is $10M #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Rachel Maddow’s net worth is $12.5M #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Barack Obama’s net worth is $10.5M. He makes $400K per year. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Alan Colmes net worth is only $12M. Salary just $2M per year. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Jon Stewart’s net worth is also $80M. Yearly salary is $15M #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Roseanne Barr’s net worth is $80M. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


Bill Maher’s net worth is $23M. #p2 #ows

17 hours ago


“@iowahawkblog: Hey #OccupyWallStreet: Michael Moore’s net worth is $50 million. And it was taken directly from people like you.” #p2

17 hours ago



	

Occupy Wall Street Photos 21 September 2011, Day 5

Occupy Wall Street Photos 21 September 2011, Day 5

Wall and Broad Streets at the New York Stock Exchange Closed[Image][Image]
Liberty Square Camp, 7:20 AM, Mostly Asleep[Image]
Preliminary Schedule for 21 September 2011[Image]
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Unveiled – Occupy Wall Street Photos 19 September 2011

Occupy Wall Street Photos 19 September 2011

Wall Street at the New York Stock Exchange Closed[Image]
Wall Street Pedestrian Traffic Corraled by Barriers[Image][Image]
Wall Street Area Financial Buildings Looming over Liberty Camp (aka Zuccotti Park)[Image]
Camp Speakers Corner[Image]
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Bystanders Observing the Speakers[Image]
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Main Camp Pizza Supplier[Image]
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Federal Reserve Bank of New York Ostensible Regulator of Wall Street Banks, One Block From Liberty Camp[Image]