Film – Mystery of Stalin’s Death

 

This Soviet figure was probably one of the most prolific leaders the world has ever known. He led the Soviet Union to victory during the Second World War, though many suffered greatly under his rule. His personal life was complicated, and the circumstances surrounding his death still remain a secret. He was the man with an iron heart: Joseph Stalin.

The Secret List of KGB Spies in Eastern Europe, Part 2, AC,

IPN BU 636/1822 ACEDOŃSKA LUDWIKA
IPN BU 00704/224 ACHAM ANNA
IPN BU 00249/525 ACHCENIAK-ZALEWSKI ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 001121/1160 ACHCENIAK-ZALEWSKI ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 645/12 ACHCIK JANINA
IPN BU 01000/831 ACHCYNG LUCJAN
IPN BU 00612/2825 ACHINGER STEFAN
IPN BU 001198/6043 ACHINGER STEFAN
IPN BU 0902/1 ACHIRON BOLESŁAW
IPN BU 0193/109 ACHMIETZYN MAKSYM
IPN BU 0866/1 ACHROMOWICZ STEFAN
IPN BU 00945/834 ACHTABOWSKA – CIECIURA ZOFIA
IPN BU 0290/11 ACMIZOW BOŻENA
IPN BU 0833/1 ACZKIEWICZ LUDWIK

The Secret List of KGB Spies in Eastern Europe, Part 1, A-B,

 

IPN BU 0772/715 ABAKUMOW ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 00690/35 ABARIS IRENA
IPN BU 0193/101 ABASZEWA JADWIGA
IPN BU 636/1801 ABASZÓW KAZIMIERA
IPN BU 001134/4527 ABBOUD BEATA BARBARA
IPN BU 00448/489 ABDUL DAEM MUSTAFA
IPN BU 001134/5465 ABDUL DEAM MUSTAFA
IPN BU 002081/263 ABDULLA SABAH
IPN BU 002085/329 ABDULLA SABAH KATHUM
IPN BU 00191/674 ABDULNABI ALSARNAF HASSAN
IPN 00 1052/100 ABDULNABI-ALSARRAF HASSAN
IPN BU 01000/380 ABELEC AUGUST
IPN 00 1052/1750 ABELEC KRZYSZTOF
IPN BU 001134/4840 ABERBACH PIERŚCIŃSKA BOŻENA
IPN BU 00399/499 ABERBACH-PIERŚCIŃSKA BOŻENA
IPN BU 002086/209 ABLEWICZ JANINA-KRYSTYNA
IPN BU 00283/1371 ABLEWSKA BARBARA
IPN BU 0891/128 ABLEWSKA KRYSTYNA
IPN BU 001134/4098 ABLEWSKI STEFAN
IPN BU 00328/47 ABŁAMOWICZ ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 0193/102 ABŁAŻEWICZ FELIKS FRANCISZEK
IPN 00 1043/18 ABOLNIK LEONIDAS
IPN BU 00611/1545 ABRACHAMIK KAZIMIERZ
IPN BU 01674/11 ABRAM ABRATOWSKI ALEKSANDER
IPN BU 00200/1417 ABRAM ANNA
IPN BU 001102/1018 ABRAM ANNA
IPN BU 0872/66 ABRAM BOLESŁAW
IPN BU 00612/3424 ABRAM ELŻBIETA
IPN BU 698/63 ABRAM JAN
IPN BU 0772/716 ABRAM JÓZEF
IPN BU 00415/313 ABRAM MARIA
IPN BU 0193/4565 ABRAM ZDZISŁAW
IPN BU 00277/291 ABRAMCZUK EWA
IPN BU 001121/2514 ABRAMCZUK EWA MARIA
IPN BU 0242/988 ABRAMCZUK JERZY JÓZEF
IPN BU 698/1 ABRAMCZYK ALINA
IPN BU 001134/3800 ABRAMCZYK BOŻENA
IPN BU 0958/62 ABRAMCZYK BRONISŁAW
IPN BU 01000/829 ABRAMCZYK BRONISŁAW
IPN BU 0958/61 ABRAMCZYK CZESŁAW
IPN BU 0218/2720 ABRAMCZYK EWA
IPN BU 0951/1947 ABRAMCZYK FRANCISZKA
IPN BU 02042/560 ABRAMCZYK JANUSZ
IPN BU 0604/1733 ABRAMCZYK JÓZEF
IPN BU 0772/595 ABRAMCZYK KRYSTYNA
IPN BU 0870/309 ABRAMCZYK MIECZYSŁAW
IPN BU 0772/719 ABRAMCZYK MIECZYSŁAW
IPN BU 0194/2807 ABRAMCZYK STANISŁAW
IPN BU 001198/1070 ABRAMCZYK STANISŁAW
IPN BU 710/149 ABRAMCZYK STEFANIA
IPN BU 00750/317 ABRAMCZYK WACŁAW
IPN BU 0193/8266 ABRAMCZYK ZDZISŁAW
IPN BU 0988/1581 ABRAMCZYK ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 00945/1398 ABRAMOWICZ – BURCZAK LUCJAN – TADEUSZ
IPN BU 00168/216 ABRAMOWICZ ADAM
IPN BU 00945/1750 ABRAMOWICZ ADAM – ZBIGNIEW
IPN 00 1052/607 ABRAMOWICZ ALICJA
IPN BU 00328/1104 ABRAMOWICZ ARKADIUSZ
IPN BU 001134/1978 ABRAMOWICZ ARKADIUSZ
IPN BU 00234 p.256 ABRAMOWICZ BORYS
IPN BU 01133/387 ABRAMOWICZ BORYS
IPN 00 1052/1443 ABRAMOWICZ ELŻBIETA
IPN BU 698/67 ABRAMOWICZ FRANCISZEK
IPN BU 645/9 ABRAMOWICZ HIPOLIT
IPN BU 01000/830 ABRAMOWICZ JAKUB
IPN BU 0772/2075 ABRAMOWICZ JANINA
IPN BU 698/2 ABRAMOWICZ JERZY
IPN BU 00612/2973 ABRAMOWICZ JERZY
IPN BU 00612/291 ABRAMOWICZ KAROL
IPN BU 001198/4206 ABRAMOWICZ KAROL
IPN BU 0193/4490 ABRAMOWICZ LUDWIK
IPN BU 00283/2387 ABRAMOWICZ MARIA
IPN BU 001134/5500 ABRAMOWICZ ROBERT
IPN BU 00448/524 ABRAMOWICZ RYSZARD
IPN BU 0957/17 ABRAMOWICZ TADEUSZ
IPN BU 0193/7969 ABRAMOWICZ TOBIASZ
IPN BU 00277/898 ABRAMOWICZ TOMASZ ANHELLI
IPN BU 001121/3084 ABRAMOWICZ TOMASZ ANHELLI
IPN BU 00612/41 ABRAMOWICZ WŁADYSŁAW
IPN BU 001198/3631 ABRAMOWICZ WŁADYSŁAW
IPN BU 0951/1421 ABRAMOWICZ ZBIGNIEW
IPN BU 00191/390 ABRAMOWSKA EWA
IPN 00 1043/3139 ABRAMOWSKA EWA
IPN BU 698/3 ABRAMOWSKA LILIANA
IPN BU 0854/1047 ABRAMOWSKA ZOFIA
IPN BU 01050/1341 ABRAMOWSKI BERNARD
IPN BU 01000/1170 ABRAMOWSKI HENRYK
IPN BU 00966/337 ABRAMOWSKI JÓZEF ROMAN
IPN BU 0864/1 ABRAMOWSKI KAZIMIERZ
IPN BU 00275/384 ABRAMOWSKI LECH
IPN BU 001134/234 ABRAMOWSKI LECH
IPN BU 00966/193 ABRAMOWSKI ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 0912/147 ABRAMSKI CZESŁAW
IPN BU 698/4 ABRAMSKI STANISŁAW
IPN BU 645/1436 ABRANTOWICZ IRENEUSZ
IPN BU 00200/510 ABRANTOWICZ IRENEUSZ
IPN 00 1052/1799 ABRANTOWICZ IRENEUSZ
IPN BU 00191/233 ABRASZKO GRZEGORZ PIOTR
IPN 00 1043/2510 ABRASZKO GRZEGORZ PIOTR
IPN BU 001198/3323 ABRATAŃSKI JAN
IPN BU 0193/5852 ABRATKIEWICZ STANISŁAW
IPN BU 0193/104 ABYCHT (KOZŁOWSKA) STANISŁAWA
IPN BU 0855/2713 ABYCHT BOGUSŁAWA

Unvealed – CIA SUCCESSFULLY CONCEALS BAY OF PIGS HISTORY

  

 

 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit yesterday joined the CIA’s cover-up of its Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961 by ruling that a 30-year-old volume of the CIA’s draft “official history” could be withheld from the public under the “deliberative process” privilege, even though four of the five volumes have previously been released with no harm either to national security or any government deliberation.

“The D.C. Circuit’s decision throws a burqa over the bureaucracy,” said Tom Blanton, director of the National Security Archive (www.nsarchive.org), the plaintiff in the case. “Presidents only get 12 years after they leave office to withhold their deliberations,” commented Blanton, “and the Federal Reserve Board releases its verbatim transcripts after five years. But here the D.C. Circuit has given the CIA’s historical office immortality for its drafts, because, as the CIA argues, those drafts might ‘confuse the public.'”

“Applied to the contents of the National Archives of the United States, this decision would withdraw from the shelves more than half of what’s there,” Blanton concluded.

The 2-1 decision, authored by Judge Brett Kavanaugh (a George W. Bush appointee and co-author of the Kenneth Starr report that published extensive details of the Monica Lewinsky affair), agreed with Justice Department and CIA lawyers that because the history volume was a “pre-decisional and deliberative” draft, its release would “expose an agency’s decision making process in such a way as to discourage candid discussion within the agency and thereby undermine the agency’s ability to perform its functions.”

This language refers to the fifth exemption (known as b-5) in the Freedom of Information Act. The Kavanaugh opinion received its second and majority vote from Reagan appointee Stephen F. Williams, who has senior status on the court.

On the 50th anniversary of the Bay of Pigs invasion in 2011, the National Security Archive’s Cuba project director, Peter Kornbluh, requested, through the FOIA, the complete release of “The Official History of the Bay of Pigs Operation” — a massive, five-volume study compiled by a CIA staff historian, Jack Pfeiffer, in the 1970s and early 1980s. Volume III had already been released under the Kennedy Assassination Records Act; and a censored version of Volume IV had been declassified years earlier pursuant to a request by Pfeiffer himself.

The Archive’s FOIA request pried loose Volumes I and II of the draft history, along with a less-redacted version of Volume IV, but the CIA refused to release Volume V, so the Archive filed suit under FOIA in 2012, represented by the expert FOIA litigator, David Sobel. In May 2012, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler held that Volume V was covered by the deliberative process privilege, and refused to order any segregation of “non-deliberative” material, as required by FOIA.

The Archive appealed the lower court’s decision, and with representation from the distinguished firm of Skadden Arps Meagher Slate & Flom, brought the case to the D.C. Circuit, with oral argument in December 2013. The National Coalition for History, including the American Historical Association and other historical and archival professional organizations, joined the case with an amicus curiae brief authored by the Jones Day law firm arguing for release of the volume.

Titled “CIA’s Internal Investigation of the Bay of Pigs Operation,” Volume V apparently contains Pfeiffer’s aggressive defense of the CIA against a hard-hitting 1961 internal review, written by the agency’s own Inspector General, which held the CIA singularly responsible for the poor assumptions, faulty planning and incompetence that led to the quick defeat of the paramilitary exile brigade by Fidel Castro’s military at the Bahia de Cochinos between April 17 and April 20, 1961.

The Archive obtained under FOIA and published the IG Report in 1998. The CIA has admitted in court papers that the Pfeiffer study contains “a polemic of recriminations against CIA officers who later criticized the operation,” as well as against other Kennedy administration officials who Pfeiffer contended were responsible for this foreign policy disaster.

In the dissenting opinion from the D.C. Circuit’s 2-1 decision yesterday, Judge Judith Rogers (appointed by Bill Clinton) identified multiple contradictions in the CIA’s legal arguments. Judge Rogers pointed out that the CIA had failed to justify why release of Volume V would “lead to public confusion” when CIA had already released Volumes I-IV. She noted that neither the CIA nor the majority court opinion had explained “why release of the draft of Volume V ‘would expose an agency’s decision making process,'” and discourage future internal deliberations within the CIA’s historical office any more than release of the previous four volumes had done.

Prior to yesterday’s decision, the Obama administration had bragged that reducing the government’s invocation of the b-5 exemption was proof of the impact of the President’s Day One commitment to a “presumption of disclosure.” Instead, the bureaucracy has actually increased in the last two years its use of the b-5 exemption, which current White House counselor John Podesta once characterized as the “withhold if you want to” exemption.

The majority opinion also left two openings for transparency advocates. It invites Congress to set a time limit for applying the b-5 exemption, as Congress has done in the Presidential Records Act. Second, it concludes that any “factual material” contained in the draft should be reachable through Freedom of Information requests.

Exposed – FOIA to Masterspy for Snowden Documents

To: dni-foia[at]dni.gov
From: John Young <jya[at]pipeline.com>
Date: 7/23/2014, 09:08 ET
Subject: FOIA Request

Jennifer L. Hudson
Director, Information Management Division
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Washington, D.C. 20511

Dear Ms. Hudson,

I request any and all information and records on documents reportedly taken by Edward Snowden from the National Security Agency, in particular:

1. An accounting of the documents by type, digital or non-digital, by number of files and pages.

2. To whom Edward Snowden transmitted the documents by name, occupation, nationality, and home address.

3. What documents were transmitted to each of the parties in Item 2, by type, number of files and pages.

4. Descriptions of consultation with the US government by those who received documents from Edward Snowden.

5. Descriptions of requests by the US government to redact or eliminate portions of the documents, to whom requests were made and date.

6. Assessments by the US government of the impact of the public release of the documents, by assessing agency with scope and date.

7. Agreements reached between the US government and the parties releasing and/or holding the documents for future release, by scope and schedule.

I am an individual seeking information for personal use and not for commercial use.

I am willing to pay $500 for my request.

I request a waiver of all fees for this request. Reason: This information will be published on the free public education website, Cryptome.org, to inform the public on the documents provided by Edward Snowden to commercial media.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

John Young
251 West 89th Street
New York, New York 10024
212-873-8700
jya[at]pipeline.com

Revealed – Marine Corps Intelligence Activity Kosovo Country Handbook

he following guide is part of a series of handbooks covering basic information and statistics about countries around the world produced by the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity. The handbooks are not released to the public.

Kosovo Country Handbook
March 2010 110 pages Download
(PDF 1.38 MB)

This handbook provides basic reference information on Kosovo, including its geography, history, government, military forces, and communications and transportation networks. This information is intended to familiarize military personnel with local customs and area knowledge to assist them during their assignment to Kosovo.

The Marine Corps Intelligence Activity is the community coordinator for the Country Handbook Program. This product reflects the coordinated U.S. Defense Intelligence Community position on Kosovo.

Dissemination and use of this publication is restricted to official military and government personnel from the United States of America, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and other countries as required and designated for support of coalition operations.

The photos and text reproduced herein have been extracted solely for research, comment, and information reporting, and are intended for fair use by designated personnel in their official duties, including local reproduction for training. Further dissemination of copyrighted material contained in this document, to include excerpts and graphics, is strictly prohibited under Title 17, U.S. Code.

MCIA-KosovoHandbook_Page_009 MCIA-KosovoHandbook_Page_043MCIA-KosovoHandbook_Page_044MCIA-KosovoHandbook_Page_045

Der PUTIN/KGB/STASI/GoMoPa-Witz des Tages: “Du vermisst die Solidarität in der DDR ?!”