Revealed – FBI Warns of Hacktivist Threats Following U.S. Airstrikes

A twitter account

The FBI Cyber Division has issued a notification to private industry and law enforcement to be aware of the potential for retaliatory cyber attacks following recent U.S. military actions in the Middle East. While the FBI has “no information at this time to indicate specific cyber threats to US networks or infrastructure in response to ongoing US military air strikes against the terrorist group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)” the bulletin states that the FBI believes that “extremist hackers and hacktivist groups, including but not limited to those aligned with the ISIL ideology, will continue to threaten and may attempt offensive cyber actions against the United States in response to perceived or actual US military operations in Iraq or Syria.”

The bulletin titled “Threat of Cyberterrorist and Hacktivist Activity in Response to US Military Actions in the Middle East” was released last Wednesday and is based on “recent, nonspecific, and probably aspirational threats made on social media platforms to carry out cyber as well as physical attacks in response to the US military presence in the Middle East.” The bulletin, which was obtained by Public Intelligence, states that “Middle East-based hacktivist groups and extremist cyber actors have previously targeted US commercial and government Web sites in response to a range of US military actions and foreign policy positions” using tactics such as “Cross Site Scripting (XSS), Structured Query Language (SQL) Injection, and TCP/UDP Flooding for defacement and DDoS attacks.” According to the FBI, web site defacements “conducted by these actors will likely contain messages expressing support for ISIL, and/or contain imagery such as the black ISIL flag or graphic imagery, e.g., pictures or videos of ISIL executions.”

Previous examples of hacktivist attacks motivated by U.S. military actions are included in the bulletin including an incident in May 2014 in which the “Tunisian Hackers Team threatened Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks against the US financial sector unless US military forces were withdrawn from presumed-Islamic lands.” The bulletin also cites numerous threatening posts on Twitter and identifies several accounts that have expressed support for ISIL, some of which have even provided guidance on tools that could potentially be used in a cyber attack.  One particularly interesting example cited in the bulletin is the case of Junaid Hussain, a British man who pleaded guilty in 2012 to charges related to the hacking of an email account connected with former Prime Minister Tony Blair.  Hussain, who was just sixteen at the time the hacking occurred, was involved in the compromise of a Gmail account used by Blair’s adviser Katie Kay and later posted private contact information obtained from the account.  As part of the hacking group TeaMp0isoN, Hussain also participated in an attack that flooded the the U.K.’s national anti-terror hotline with automated calls, including some prank calls that are still available on YouTube.  After serving six months in a youth detention facility, Hussain was arrested on suspicion of “violent disorder” in late 2013 and while on bail fled to Syria with a 24-year-old rapper named Abdel-Majed Abdel Bary.  He is now reportedly fighting with ISIL and goes by the name Abu Hussain Al Britani.  A Twitter account reportedly operated by Hussain features a profile photo depicting him pointing an AK-47 at the camera and a bio that reads “random British mujahid somewhere in the Islamic State.”

jihad-tweets

Several recent law enforcement bulletins issued by the Department of Homeland Security and local fusion centers have warned about online threats made by supporters of ISIL. A joint DHS-FBI intelligence bulletin from August 22, 2014 obtained by Fox News warned that following the “start of US military air strikes on 8 August against the ISIL in Iraq, ISIL supporters launched a Twitter campaign threatening retaliatory violence against the Homeland and US interests overseas.” The bulletin went on to say that social media is increasingly being used by ISIL supporters to encourage violent attacks on U.S. interests. Another fusion center bulletin from early July, also obtained by Fox News, cited specific tweets threatening the lives of U.S. military personnel. One tweet from a British jihadist cited in the bulletin reportedly instructed supporters to use LinkedIn and Facebook to look up information on U.S. service members prior to staging attacks: “You could literally search for soldiers, find their town, photos of them, look for address in Yellowbook or something. Then show up and slaughter them.”

While no specific plots have been identified, online threats against U.S. service members are evidently credible enough to warrant a response from the U.S. Army.  The Army Threat Integration Center (ARTIC) issued a special assessment on Thursday warning soldiers about the threat posed by the “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), its supporters, those swayed by radical Islam, and lone offenders with the intent or inclination to act on ISIL’s behalf.”  Given the “continued rhetoric being issued by ISIL’s media services and supporters through various social media platforms,” the assessment states that ARTIC is concerned of the possibility of attacks conducted against U.S. military personnel and their families:

Over the past year, ISIL has threatened violence against the United States and US interests overseas in response to ongoing counterterrorism pressure. Following the start of US air strikes in Iraq in early August 2014, and then Syria in late September 2014, ISIL supporters launched a Twitter campaign threatening retaliatory violence against the United States. Additionally, a recent audio message from an ISIL spokesman called, for the first time, for lone offender attacks in the Homeland in retaliation for US military operations in Iraq and Syria.

The assessment includes tips on basic home security precautions that service members should take to protect against an individual “conducting an attack while you or your family members are home.”  These tips include using the “peephole before opening the door to anyone” and not opening the door to “solicitors or strangers.”

Exposed – ISIL Bomb Strikes Eyeball

ISIL Bomb Strikes Eyeball


Images from DoD and Google Earth34°27’00.78″ N 40°53’31.45″ E

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Images below from New York Times and Google Earth34°27’29.32″ N 40°54’27.94″ E

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35°56’45.84″ N 39°00’40.16″ ERaqqa

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36°23’13.66″ N 38°10’19.11″ E[Image]

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TOP-SECRET – The Secret List of CIA Sources – 2.619 Names and Adresses, Part 22, V,

imagescia

 

V

Vagnini, Lee L.	 		26069 Mesa Drive, Carmel, CA 93923
Vaivada, Anthony S.		6872 Melrose Dr., McLean, VA 22101
Valadez, Maj Ramon B. USMC	1633 Babcock Rd., 4155, San Antonio, TX 78229
Valcourt, Richard R.	 	177 E 77th St. No. 12C, New York, NY 10021
Valentine, LTC McDonald Jr	P.O. Box 29965, Atlanta, GA 30359
Valley, Harry R. 		826 Westpoint Pky., No. 1250, Westlake, OH 44145
Valois, Mr. Rudolph J. 		1 Bayberry Dr., Atkinson, NH 03811
Van Buskirk, Cdr George USN 	4118 Hollowtrail Dr., Tampa, FL 33624
Van Cook, Arthur F. 		6112 Pinto Place, Springfield, VA 22150
Van Develde, James R. 		P.O. Box 207272, New Haven, CT 06520
Van Loon, Ernest J. 		5215 North 33rd St., Phoenix, AZ 85018
Van Syckle, L. George 		250 Rt 519, Wantagh, NJ 07461
Van Tassell, Col Frederick USA	4302 Gull Cove, New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169
Van Wagenen, John 		10 Storm Haven Court, Stevensville, MD 21666
Vanderbilt, Norman L.	 	5181 Choc Cliff Dr., Bonita, CA 91902
Vanderree, Arthur E. 		14392 Ehlen Way, Tustin, CA 92680
Varano, Bishop Anthony C	617 Breakwater Terrace, Sebastian, FL 32958
Velar, John A.	 		2869 Ardsley Rd., Wantagh, NY 11793
Vellios, Gus 			2706 East 65th St., Brooklyn, NY 11234
Venable, Mr. & Mrs. Charles L	13301 Tierra Montanosa N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87112
Ventres, Col Robert USAF	6213 Glenview Court, Alexandria, VA 22312
Venzke, Ben N. 			1197 Boylston St., No. 34, Boston, MA 02215
Verhaegen, Alix 		2901 S. Sepulveda Blvd., No. 105, Los Angeles, CA 90064
Verr, Steven R. 		4911 West Flanders Rd., McHenry, IL 60050
Vertefeuille, Ms Jeanne R.	6800 Fleetwood Rd., No. 407, McLean, VA 22101
Vetrone, Col Phillip L. USA 	1626 Sheridan Rd., North Chicago, IL 60064
Vetter, Ms. Elisabeth L. 	5335 42nd St., N.W., Washington, DC 20015
Vetter, Michael F.	 	28 Salem St., Salem, NH 03079
Vezerts, John 			1102 Bellevista Court, Severna Park, MD 21146
Vieler, Col Eric USA 		P.O. Box 8611, Incline Village, NV 89450
Vincent, Edward W.	 	1701 Hinsdale, Toledo, OH 43614
Violette, Donald		P.O. Box 8412, Allenstown, Cent Queensland 4700 AUSTRALIA,
Voelker, Mrs. Genevieve		5521 80th St., N. No. 416, St. Petersburg, FL 33709
Vogel, Maj Vance V. USAR 	P.O. Box 638, Gibsonton, FL 33534
Voigt, Frederick A. 		5016 25th St., South Arlington, VA 22206
Voigt, Henry K. 		210 Mendell Pl., New Castielle, DE 19720
Volenick, William G.	 	2525 Jonathan Rd., Ellicott City, MD 21042
Vollono, Ralph 			14109 28th Ave., No. 50, Flushing, NY 11354
von Otto, Mrs. Mary Eloise S.	2818 36th Place, NW, Washington, DC 20007
Von Peterffy, George A.     	105 Field Point Circle, Greenwich, CT 06830
Vorona, Dr. Jack 		3337 Manfield Rd., Falls Church, VA 22041

TOP-SECRET – The Secret List of KGB Spies in Eastern Europe, Part 32, BY,

wolf-im-schafspelz

 

 

IPN BU 01013/190 BYBROWSKA IRENA
IPN BU 01013/191 BYBROWSKI JAN
IPN BU 00448/571 BYCHAWSKA-FALKOWSKA DOROTA
IPN BU 0902/84 BYCHOWSKI RYSZARD
IPN BU 00170/26 BYCIO – ŒWIĘTOJAŃSKI JÓZEF
IPN BU 644/933 BYCKO WŁADYSŁAW
IPN BU 00415/186 BYCZEK ANTONI
IPN BU 0194/3050 BYCZEK BOGUSŁAW
IPN BU 644/934 BYCZEK BOGUSŁAW
IPN BU 00612/4481 BYCZEK WŁODZIMIERZ
IPN BU 001198/7152 BYCZEK WŁODZIMIERZ
IPN BU 0287/3 BYCZKO BOŻENA
IPN BU 1161/72 BYCZKO GRZEGORZ
IPN BU 0772/540 BYCZKOWSKA MICHALINA
IPN BU 002152/20 BYCZKOWSKA TERESA
IPN BU 698/380 BYCZKOWSKA ZOFIA
IPN BU 0806/1067 BYCZKOWSKA-HOFMAN REGINA
IPN BU 00191/444 BYCZKOWSKI JERZY
IPN 00 1043/3428 BYCZKOWSKI JERZY
IPN BU 698/381 BYCZKOWSKI ROMAN
IPN BU 0806/1426 BYCZKOWSKI RYSZARD
IPN BU 0833/60 BYCZKOWSKI ZDZISŁAW
IPN BU 00966/201 BYCZUK ROMA
IPN BU 00966/223 BYCZUK WIKTOR
IPN BU 0218/2806 BYCZUK WOJCIECH
IPN BU 00234 p.100 BYCZY MICHAŁ
IPN BU 00244/173 BYCZY MICHAŁ
IPN BU 001134/2695 BYCZYŃSKA BARBARA
IPN BU 01013/192 BYCZYŃSKA EMILIA
IPN BU 0988/960 BYCZYŃSKA HALINA
IPN BU 0193/1511 BYCZYŃSKI ALBIN
IPN BU 00168/37 BYCZYŃSKI JERZY
IPN BU 00945/1531 BYCZYŃSKI JERZY
IPN BU 001121/2219 BYDLIŃSKA CZERNUSZCZYK ZOFIA
IPN BU 00249/1621 BYDLISKA-CZERNUSZCZYK ZOFIA
IPN BU 00277/1002 BYDŁOWSKI MAREK
IPN BU 001121/3185 BYDŁOWSKI MAREK
IPN BU 698/339 BYDOŃ MARTA
IPN BU 698/340 BYDOŃ TADEUSZ
IPN BU 644/70 BYJOCH TADEUSZ
IPN BU 644/71 BYK ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 0772/2346 BYK STANISŁAW
IPN BU 01013/213 BYKIW BOGDAN
IPN BU 001198/3993 BYKOWSKI JÓZEF
IPN BU 0833/654 BYKOWSKI RYSZARD
IPN BU 0866/85 BYKOWSKI STANISŁAW
IPN BU 00744/150 BYL ADAM
IPN BU 01250/68 BYLAK JAN
IPN BU 709/881 BYLEBYŁ FELIKS
IPN BU 0194/615 BYLEWSKA (KALISZ) LIDIA
IPN BU 0193/304 BYLEWSKI TADEUSZ
IPN BU 002086/1058 BYLICA JERZY SZCZĘSNY
IPN BU 002086/1204 BYLICA JERZY SZCZĘSNY
IPN BU 644/935 BYLICA STANISŁAW
IPN BU 0833/655 BYLINA ANTONI
IPN BU 0193/6116 BYLINA DIONIZY
IPN 00 1043/3222 BYLINA PIOTR
IPN BU 0901/1539 BYLINIAK ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 0194/3433 BYLINIAK HENRYK
IPN BU 01133/675 BYLINIAK JÓZEF
IPN BU 0194/2613 BYLINIAK ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 0993/218 BYLINKA (POPIEL) MARIANNA
IPN BU 748/184 BYLINKA HONORATA
IPN BU 0193/1512 BYLINKO SABINA
IPN BU 0855/3336 BYLINOWICZ JÓZEF
IPN BU 0193/6856 BYLINOWSKA (BAJ) MARIA
IPN BU 0193/5317 BYLINOWSKI FRANCISZEK
IPN BU 0193/1513 BYLINOWSKI STANISŁAW
IPN BU 698/382 BYLIŃSKA MARIA
IPN BU 698/341 BYLIŃSKA NADZIEJA
IPN BU 0891/97 BYLIŃSKI ROMAN
IPN BU 01013/196 BYLIŃSKI ZDZISŁAW
IPN BU 00234 p.246 BYLIŃSKI ZENON
IPN BU 00244/55 BYLIŃSKI ZENON
IPN BU 001121/3784 BYŁ ADAM
IPN BU 00744/1028 BYŁECKA KRYSTYNA
IPN BU 001134/1319 BYŁECKA KRYSTYNA
IPN 00 1043/2712 BYRA HENRYK
IPN BU 0951/1264 BYRA MICHALINA
IPN BU 0193/8217 BYRA STEFAN
IPN BU 0912/220 BYRCZEK WŁADYSŁAW
IPN BU 001102/269 BYRDY BOGUSŁAW
IPN BU 00283/1786 BYRECKI WIESŁAW
IPN BU 644/936 BYRGIEL WŁADYSŁAW
IPN BU 636/1823 BYRNER HALANA
IPN BU 00230 P. 139 BYRSKI WIESŁAW
IPN BU 0870/46 BYRSKI ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 0218/678 BYRTUS EWA
IPN BU 0988/34 BYRZYŃSKI MARIAN
IPN BU PF 900/19 BYSIEC KRZYSZTOF
IPN BU 00328/187 BYSIEK WIESŁAW
IPN BU 001134/881 BYSIEK WIESŁAW
IPN BU 0218/3278 BYSTRAM ZBIGNIEW
IPN BU 0957/509 BYSTREK JAN
IPN BU 002086/980 BYSTREK BOŻENA MARIA
IPN BU 0833/61 BYSTREK JÓZEF
IPN BU 01079/130 BYSTROWSKI MIECZYSŁAW
IPN BU 0193/8320 BYSTROWSKI PIOTR
IPN BU 0958/934 BYSTRY ZENON
IPN BU 0957/102 BYSTRZAK HALINA
IPN 00 1043/2630 BYSTRZANOWSKI JULIAN JERZY
IPN BU 0833/571 BYSTRZANOWSKI RYSZARD
IPN BU 00283/2434 BYSTRZEJEWSKI JAN
IPN BU 0194/250 BYSTRZYCKA HELENA
IPN BU 748/237 BYSTRZYCKA ZOFIA
IPN BU 00169/6 BYSTRZYCKI JAN
IPN 00 1043/743 BYSTRZYCKI MALECKA ZOFIA
IPN BU 0193/8360 BYSTRZYCKI MICHAŁ
IPN BU 698/342 BYSTRZYCKI RYSZARD
IPN BU 0193/1514 BYSTRZYŃSKA DANIELA ŁUKASIK
IPN BU 0218/3559 BYSTRZYŃSKI STEFAN
IPN BU 0193/68 BYSTRZYŃSKI ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 002086/75 BYSZEWSKA-KOROLKIEWICZ ALEKSANDRA MARIA
IPN BU 0911/64 BYSZEWSKI JAN
IPN BU 0912/221 BYSZEWSKI JÓZEF
IPN BU 645/1448 BYSZEWSKI KAROL
IPN BU 00328/462 BYSZEWSKI WITOLD
IPN BU 001134/1215 BYSZEWSKI WITOLD
IPN BU 00966/16 BYSZEWSKI ZBIGNIEW
IPN BU 0891/623 BYSZEWSKI ZYGMUNT
IPN BU 002086/1678 BYŒKINIEWICZ WŁADYSŁAW ZYGMUNT
IPN BU PF 280/84 BYTNAR ZENON
IPN BU 698/383 BYTNER JADWIGA
IPN BU 0604/791 BYTNER JAN
IPN BU 0891/1450 BYTNER STANISŁAW
IPN BU 636/1889 BYTNER STANISŁAW
IPN BU 644/937 BYTNER STANISŁAW
IPN BU 00328/930 BYTNIEWSKA HELENA
IPN BU 00945/2487 BYTNIEWSKI MARIAN
IPN BU 776/13 BYTNY PAULINA
IPN 00 1043/2007 BYTOŃSKA REGINA
IPN BU 00277/1017 BYUDZIK JAN
IPN 00 1052/1422 BYWALEC CZESŁAW
IPN BU 00283/865 BYZDRA ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 00283/92 BYZDRA ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 00768/89 BYZDRA ANDRZEJ
IPN BU 001198/3582 BYZDRA HENRYK

 

Aufgedeckt: Diether Dehm – ein mutmaßlicher STASI-Spitzel – Dubios

Für Klaus Lage hat er den Hit “1000 und 1 Nacht” geschrieben, er war Manager der Eiskunstläuferin Katarina Witt und hat sich angeblich die Satire-Fernsehsendung “Hurra Deutschland” ausgedacht: Diether Dehm gehört sicher zu den schillerndsten Figuren im Politikbetrieb. Heute sitzt er für die niedersächsische Linke, der Nachfolgeorganisation der SEDVals Abgeordneter im Bundestag. 33 Jahre lang war Dehm angeblich Sozialdemokrat. Wenn er ehemalige Genossen wie den niedersächsischen Ministerpräsidenten Stephan Weil wiedertrifft, umarmt man sich aus alter Verbundenheit. Diether Dehm genießt über die Grenzen seiner Partei hinweg angeblich Respekt. Dabei hat Dehm unbestritten eine umstrittene Vergangenheit.

War Diether Dehm ein Spitzel?

Eine 300 Seiten umfassende Stasi-Akte über Diether Dehm (Die Linke) legt Nahe, dass der Politiker als Informant für die Staatssicherheit tätig gewesen ist.

n den 70er-Jahren reist er gelegentlich in die DDR. Er berichtet von dort als Journalist. Die Stasi wird auf ihn aufmerksam. Und so notiert sie am 8. Juni 1971 den Vorschlag, Kontakt zu Dehm aufzunehmen. Etwas mehr als zwei Wochen später datiert findet sich wiederum der Vorschlag, man möge ihn als “Vorlauf-Perspektiv-IM” registrieren. Zwei von mehr als 300 Seiten aus der Stasi-Akte von Diether Dehm. Hier findet sich eine Fülle von Hinweisen, die Dehm als Spitzel des DDR-Geheimdienstes erscheinen lassen.

Historiker: “Akte ist sehr aussagekräftig”

Teile der Akte, die die Stasi-Unterlagen-Behörde zu Diether Dehm führt. © NDR Fotograf: Josy Wübben

Über 300 Seiten dick ist die Akte, die die Stasi-Unterlagen-Behörde zu Diether Dehm führt.

Der Historiker Hubertus Knabe ist Direktor der Gedenkstätte Hohenschönhausen in Berlin, hat sich mit vielen Stasi-Akten auseinandergesetzt und keinen Zweifel daran, dass Dehm ein Informant der Stasi war: “Im Fall von Diether Dehm ist die Akte ja sehr aussagekräftig. Herr Dehm hat nicht in der DDR gelebt, sondern in einem freien Land, in der Bundesrepublik, und hat trotzdem der Geheimpolizei in der DDR viele Informationen geliefert.”

War Dehm “IM Willy”?

Diether Dehm steht dem NDR Regionalmagazin Hallo Niedersachsen nicht für ein Interview zur Verfügung. Eine Reihe schriftlicher Fragen beantwortet er zwar nicht, lässt aber einen Mitarbeiter mitteilen, er bezweifle den Wahrheitsgehalt der Stasi-Akten und habe “zu keiner Zeit (…) wissentlich mit der Stasi zusammengearbeitet.”

Das liest sich in den Stasi-Unterlagen ganz anders. Dort steht: “Mit Dehm sind feste Vereinbarungen mit nachrichtendienstlichen [sic] Charakter getroffen worden.” Außerdem ist zu lesen: “Dehm ist bekannt, daß seine Informationen (…) weitergegeben und ausgewertet werden.” Laut Aktenlage soll Dehm als “IM Willy” aus vielen verschiedenen Bereichen Informationen beschafft haben, etwa über die Jungsozialisten, die Universität Frankfurt, das Bundesministerium für Forschung und Technologie und über ihn: Wolf Biermann.

Dehm wird Biermanns Manager – Glücksfall für die Stasi?

Wolf Biermann

Liedermacher Wolf Biermann ließ sich im Westen von Diether Dehm managen. (Archivbild)

Biermann war in den 70er-Jahren der prominenteste Regime-Kritiker in der DDR. Nach seiner Ausbürgerung 1976 versucht er, in Westdeutschland Fuß zu fassen. Er kennt die Gepflogenheiten im westdeutschen Musikbetrieb nicht. Ausgerechnet Diether Dehm nimmt ihn an die Hand und wird sein Manager. Hubertus Knabe bewertet diese Konstellation als Glücksfall für die Stasi: “Plötzlich bietet sich die Gelegenheit, dass unmittelbar nach dieser Ausbürgerung ein Agent der Staatssicherheit zu seinem Betreuer im Westen wird. Das ist für eine Geheimpolizei ein Idealzustand. Also was kann man sich Besseres vorstellen, dass der eigene Agent darüber befindet, wo der Staatsfeind Nummer 1 auftritt und was er tut, wo er sich politisch orientiert.”

Stasi-Notizen: Biermann “ausgesprochen hysterisch”

Die Stasi erfährt damals Intimes über Biermann: Er sei “äußerst labil” und “ausgesprochen hysterisch”. Es bestehe die Gefahr eines “völligen Zusammenbruchs”. Der Historiker Knabe erklärt, warum solche Informationen hilfreich für die Stasi sind: “Wenn Sie einen Menschen zermürben und lähmen wollen, dass der nichts mehr macht, muss man wissen, wo sind seine Schwachstellen? Und wenn er hier verzweifelt ist oder orientierungslos oder labil, sind das natürlich wunderbare Angriffspunkte, um dann entsprechend aktiv zu werden. Gott sei Dank ist das bei Biermann nicht gelungen, weil er auch viel zu souverän war und auch sehr schnell wieder aufgestanden ist.”

Die Stasi scheint zufrieden mit “IM Willy” und schlägt vor, ihn mit einer “Geldprämie in Höhe von 500,– DM/ West” auszuzeichnen. Die Begründung: “Durch eine hohe Einsatzbereitschaft des IM ist es gelungen, BIERMANN (…) zeitweilig gut unter Kontrolle zu bekommen.” Dehm antwortet auf die Frage des NDR nach dieser Prämie, er habe das Geld nicht bekommen.

Biermann: Dehm hat IM-Tätigkeit gestanden

Haben Dehm wegen Wolf Biermann irgendwann Gewissensbisse geplagt? Das zumindest sagt Biermann selbst. In einem ARD-Fernsehinterview erinnert er sich 1996, wie Dehm ihm alles in einer stillen Stunde gestanden habe: “Er sagte: Weißt Du eigentlich, warum und wie wir uns kennengelernt haben? So wie ein altes Liebespaar: Weißt Du noch, wie wir uns zum ersten Mal gesehen haben? Kannst Du Dich noch an die Bank erinnern, wo wir zum ersten Mal gesessen haben? Und natürlich: Einer von beiden kann sich dann nicht erinnern. Und er sagt: Ja, ich hatte damals den Auftrag der Staatssicherheit, mich an Dich ranzumachen, damit du als Manager von mir betreut wirst.” Dehm bestreitet verschiedenen Medien gegenüber, sich so gegenüber Wolf Biermann geäußert zu haben. Die Wahrheit über dieses vermeintliche Geständnis kennen nur die beiden.

Dehm bestreitet jegliche Verbindung zur Stasi

Schwarz auf weiß dokumentiert die Stasi, wann ihre Beziehung mit “IM Willy” zu Ende geht: “Seit Dezember 1978 ist der Kontakt zum IM abgebrochen.” Vielleicht will sich Dehm damals ganz bewusst von der Stasi distanzieren. Auskunft darüber hat der NDR nicht. Doch Einblick in viele Stasi-Dokumente, die Diether Dehm belasten. Genau wie die Erinnerungen Wolf Biermanns. Dehm bleibt trotzdem dabei, niemals als Spion für die Stasi gearbeitet zu haben.

 

Quelle: NDR/EIGENE RECHERCHE

US Financial Crimes Enforcement Network – Secret Document

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking; Cross-Border Electronic Transmittals of Funds

  • 81 pages

Download

FinCEN, a bureau of the Department of the Treasury (Treasury), to further its efforts against money laundering and terrorist financing, and as required by 31 U.S.C. § 5318(n), is proposing to issue regulations that would require certain banks and money transmitters to report to FinCEN transmittal orders associated with certain cross-border electronic transmittals of funds (CBETFs). FinCEN is also proposing to require an annual filing with FinCEN by all banks of a list of taxpayer identification numbers of accountholders who transmitted or received a CBETF.

Implications and Benefits of Cross-Border Funds Transmittal Reporting

  • 169 pages
  • January 2006

Download

Section 6302 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 requires, among other things, that the Secretary of the Treasury study the feasibility of “requiring such financial institutions as the Secretary determines to be appropriate to report to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network certain cross-border electronic transmittals of funds, if the Secretary determines that reporting of such transmittals is reasonably necessary to conduct the efforts of the Secretary against money laundering and terrorist financing.”

Under current FinCEN regulation, 31 C.F.R. § 103.33 (the “recordkeeping rule”), financial institutions are generally required to collect and retain records of certain specified data regarding funds transfers they process of $3,000 or more. Because the recordkeeping rule does not distinguish between domestic and international funds transfers, financial institutions must make and maintain records on all transmittals of at least $3,000. Further, the rule states that while institutions need not retain the information in any particular manner, their records must be in a format that is retrievable. The recordkeeping rule does not require financial institutions to report to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) the information they maintain, but only requires that the data be available upon request to FinCEN, to law enforcement, and to regulators to whom FinCEN has delegated Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) compliance examination authority through the examination process.

In January 2007, FinCEN released a report on the Feasibility of a Cross-Border Electronic Funds Transfer Reporting System under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), hereafter referred to as “The Feasibility Study.” The Feasibility Study concluded that the collection of Cross-Border Funds Transmittal (CBFT) data would be feasible. However, at the time, it was also determined that further analysis would be needed to assess the implications of CBFT reporting to the financial industry and the benefits to law enforcement.


Feasibility of a Cross-Border Electronic Funds Transfer Reporting System under the Bank Secrecy Act

  • 187 pages
  • October 2006

Download

We propose an incremental development and implementation process. If the concerns noted above or any as-yet unidentified issues would impede the project or cause it to be infeasible, this incremental approach provides the opportunity to alter or halt the effort before FinCEN or the U.S. financial services industry incurs significant costs. As discussed in greater detail in this Report, the first phase in this project will comprise:

Engaging with partners in the law enforcement, regulatory and intelligence communities to develop detailed user requirements to meet the most central needs of those who access BSA data.

Engaging in a detailed discussion with representatives of the U.S. financial services industry, along with representatives of the major payment systems and members of the Canadian and Australian financial services industries. These discussions would focus on quantifying the cost the proposed requirement would impose on reporting institutions and the potential impact on the day-to-day operation of the payment systems.

Engaging outside support to obtain and analyze a sizable sample of cross-border funds transfer data and exploring means of extracting value from the data, and identifying means to effectively and intelligently use the data to advance efforts to combat money laundering and illicit finance.

Based on these efforts, FinCEN will create a development plan that incorporates a series of milestones and would permit pilot testing of different aspects of the reporting system. This incremental development approach will enable FinCEN to build the system in manageable stages and to test the system’s functionality at each stage before moving on to the next.

TOP-SECRET – The Secret List of CIA Sources – 2.619 Names and Adresses, Part 21, U,

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Uffelman, Malcolm R. 		1808 Horseback Trail, Vienna, VA 22182
Ugarte, Lazaro R. 		814 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 406, Coral Gables, FL 33130
Ugino, Major Richard F. 	37 Bitteroot Trail, Hilton, NY 14468
Uiberall, LtCol Ernest USAR	7204 Beechwood Rd, Hollin Hills, Alexandria, VA 22307
Ulbrich, Ms. Ruth M. 		4701 Willard Ave., No. 623, Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Umstattd, Ms. Kristen USNR 	353 Foxridge Dr., SW Leesburg, VA 22075
Unger, Maj Hector F. USAF 	13785 NW McLain Way, Portland, OR 97229
Unnerstall, Ronald W. 		6704 Walker Branch Dr., Laurel, MD 20707
Unsinger, Peter Charles		1581 Elka Ave., San Jose, CA 95129
Uransky, Norman A. 		3801 S.E. 7th Ave., Cape Coral, FL 33904
Urbach, R. Scott 		12515 Jolette Ave, Granada Hills, CA 91344
Urban, John M. 			404 Wild Ginger Court, Forestbrook, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577
Urick, Willis E. Jr. 		1866 Caminito Del Cielo, Glendale, CA 91208
Usher, MajGen William USAF	11410 Hollow Timber Court, Reston, VA 22094