TOP- SECRET – U.S. Army Security Force Handbook

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1. The Basic Security Force Unit

Throughout the Iraqi theater, units tailor security forces in order to meet the requirements of the mission. The equipment used is also modified depending on the operating environment. However, most security forces share common building blocks used in this handbook.

Tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) in this handbook are based on the model of a common base security force unit. The basic security force platform is generally the M1114, the XM1117 (armored security vehicle), the RG31 (multipurpose vehicle), or an equivalent gun truck. Designated security force companies are currently equipped with the M1114s as their main gun truck. Each platform has a minimum of three Soldiers: a truck commander, gunner, and driver.

One squad (section for artillery security force units) consisting of four platforms is the standard package for most missions. The squad conducts autonomous security force missions and is left alone at combat outposts for long stretches. Squads are the most common organization receiving the security force missions discussed in this handbook.

Modification tables of organization and equipment (MTOE) designated security force units can be task-organized to any battalion. Generally security force units are not task-organized below company/battery level; however, it is common to see platoons designated a specific mission for extended periods of time, i.e., as a police transition team (PTT), convoy security, or personal security detachment (PSD). Many company-size units (usually field artillery) are transforming into MTOE security force companies. MTOE security force companies consist of three platoons plus an additional platform for the commander. Each platoon consists of three squads, plus an additional platform for the platoon leader. This composition gives the company a total of 40 platforms plus additional vehicles for support personnel. Most battalions also have an internal security force unit primarily for PSD and occasionally for convoy security. The composition of these internal security forces depends on platform availability, type of mission, and scope of the operation. This handbook also provides these types of security forces valid TTP, as well as common before, during, and after considerations for their operations.

2. Types of Security Force Missions

a. Convoy security. Both military and civilian convoys are subject to attack from insurgents, necessitating constant security. While most military convoys will have an internal security force, civilian convoys do not have that capability. For this reason security forces are often tasked to escort convoys consisting of two or more vehicles. The size of the convoy determines the number of required security force squads. The general rule of thumb is one platform (M1114) for every five vehicles in the civilian convoy. Platoon leaders may choose to add platforms to squads or lead a mission with multiple squads. (Note: Types of convoys often escorted are listed in Annex A).

b. PSD. PSD is conducted regularly by almost every unit in Operation Iraqi Freedom. PSD may include the security of a unit commander or sergeant major, a dignitary or local leader, or even a detainee. Security forces are charged with escorting VIPs from point A to point B. Given the operating environment in Iraq, a well-trained PSD is essential for the safety of VIPs and the Soldiers conducting the missions.

c. Site security. Security forces may be required to conduct site security as part of their convoy operations. Depending on the type of mission, site security may require Soldiers to conduct dismounted security. Examples of site security where Soldiers dismount include restricting access to an area due to an improvised explosive device or providing security around a building in a populated area. Examples of site security where Soldiers do not dismount include waiting for recovery assets while the squad provides security for a downed vehicle or road security when a squad is required to secure access into an alternate supply route.

d. Other missions. While other missions are beyond the scope of this handbook, it is important to note security forces conduct numerous other types of missions. The most current (FY 2006) critical mission is training the Iraqi Police (IP). This mission requires security forces and MP units to link and develop habitual relationships with the IP. Some units man the IP basic training academies, while others monitor IP station progress and provide additional training. This mission also requires Soldiers to fully understand how Iraqis conduct business. Soldiers must be prepared to conduct a variety of classes with the assistance of an interpreter. Knowledge of basic police station administrative requirements will assist in this mission.

Another common mission is detainee operations. Most forward operations bases (FOBs) have some sort of detainee facility. The responsibility for maintaining security inside and outside the facility often falls to security forces. This responsibility includes the daily health and welfare of the inmates and their administrative and logistical requirements, as well as the movement of detainees within the FOB or to other sites. Occasionally security forces will transport detainees by air to distant FOBs.

When contact is made with the enemy, security forces must be prepared to engage and destroy the enemy. Security forces should develop basic contact battle drills aimed at maneuvering, fixing, and eliminating the enemy.

 

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Brooklyn Rules – Full Movie – Alec Baldwin

Alec Baldwin co-stars in this mob thriller set in Brooklyn 1985, and filled with star-studded cameos (Scott Caan, Mena Suvari, Freddie Prinze Jr. and others).

Director Michael Corrente’s coming-of-age comedy drama Brooklyn Rules unfurls in 1985, coincident with the early rise of John Gotti. Three young Brooklyn men of Italian-American heritage — Michael Turner (Freddie Prinze Jr.), Carmine Mancuso (Scott Caan), and Bobby Canzoneri (Jerry Ferrara) — make the pivotal, potentially irreversible choices that will determine their directions in life. The boys’ periodic run-ins with a sadistic mobster type who rules the neighborhood, Caesar Manganaro (Alec Baldwin), suggest the ever-present option of drifting into a career of crime. On the surface, Michael courageously and doggedly bucks this choice, opting instead for the pre-law program at Columbia and a straight-laced romance with blonde-haired, blue-eyed coed Ellen (Mena Suvari), yet this path is not as antiseptic as it may seem, for he actually scammed his way into the law program. Meanwhile, Carmine idolizes Caesar, and his desire to emulate this thug not only compromises his own moral integrity, but threatens to jeopardize the stability of Michael’s life as well by drawing him into a sticky web of criminal activity. While the first two men navigate these treacherous paths, the third friend, Bobby, stakes out safer ground with a low-key job at the post office and married life with his intended. Over the course of it all, the boys’ bonds of friendship become stressed and strained given the divergence of their paths.

Unveiled by Cryptome and the Media – Free Syrian Army Photos 5

Free Syrian Army Photos 5

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This citizen journalism image provided by Shaam News Network (SNN), taken on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, purports to show children killed by shabiha, pro-government militiamen, being prepared for burial in a mass grave in Daraya, Syria. According to activists’ accounts, government forces retook the Damascus suburb of Daraya from rebel control three days earlier and have since gone on a killing spree. Reports of the death toll range widely from more than 300 to as many as 600. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS CITIZEN JOURNALIST IMAGE. AP

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This citizen journalism image provided by Shaam News Network SNN, taken on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, purports to show people killed by shabiha pro-government militiamen being prepared for a mass burial in Daraya, Syria. According to activists’ accounts, government forces retook the Damascus suburb of Daraya from rebel control three days ago and have since gone on a killing spree. Reports of the death toll range widely from more than 300 to as many as 600. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS CITIZEN JOURNALIST IMAGE. AP

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This citizen journalism image provided by Shaam News Network SNN, taken on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, purports to show people killed by shabiha, pro-government militiamen, being buried in a mass grave in Daraya, Syria. According to activists’ accounts, government forces retook the Damascus suburb of Daraya from rebel control three days ago and have since gone on a killing spree. Reports of the death toll range widely from more than 300 to as many as 600. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS CITIZEN JOURNALIST IMAGE. AP

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This citizen journalism image provided by Shaam News Network SNN, taken on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, purports to show people who were killed by shabiha, pro-government militiamen in Daraya, Syria. According to activists’ accounts, government forces retook the Damascus suburb of Daraya from rebel control three days ago and have since gone on a killing spree. Reports of the death toll range widely from more than 300 to as many as 600. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS CITIZEN JOURNALIST IMAGE. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Tawfiq Hassan, 23, a former butcher, poses for a picture, after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. In their previous lives, they were butchers, barbers, construction workers and university students. Now they are rebels fighting a civil war they hope will end the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad. AP

 

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Syrian rebel fighter, who goes by the name Saqir Abu Zahid, 22, a former University student, poses for a picture after returning from fighting Syrian forces in Aleppo at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Abu Hammam, 23, a former member of the Syrian security forces, poses for a picture, after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Wisam Al-Saleh, 21, poses for a picture, after returning back from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Mohammed Yaseen, 24, a former construction worker, poses for a picture, after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Ali Alnajjr, 20, a former school student, poses for a picture, after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Ahmed Al-Saleh, 22, a former policeman, poses for a picture after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Badir Farouh, 17, poses for a picture after returning from fighting against Syrian forces in Aleppo at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Mohammed Sami, 22, a barber, poses for a picture after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Amir Hajji, 20, poses for a picture, after returning back from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012.  AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Mohammed Abu Razouk, 27, poses for a picture, after returning back from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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Syrian rebel fighter, Mustafa Abu Shaheen, 19, a former construction worker, poses for a picture after returning from fighting against Syrian army forces in Aleppo, at a rebel headquarters in Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, Syria, Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012. AP

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An injured Free Syrian Army group leader discusses the plan with his fighters, in Aleppo’s district of Al-Zebdieh August 26, 2012. Reuters

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Members of the Free Syrian Army discuss strategies in Aleppo’s district of Al-Zebdieh August 26, 2012. Reuters

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Free Syrian Army fighters drive through the area after missiles fired from a fighter jet hit a petrol tanker in the Bab al-Nayrab district in Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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A Free Syrian Army fighter runs away to take cover from a sniper shooting near the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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A Free Syrian Army sniper takes his position in the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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A Free Syrian Army sniper takes his position in the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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Free Syrian Army fighters walk in the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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A Free Syrian Army fighter walks by a power pack detonator for an explosive in the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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Free Syrian Army fighters walk in the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuters

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Ruins line a street in the middle of the Salah El Dine neighbourhood of Syria’s southwest city of Aleppo August 26, 2012. Reuter

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Rebel fighters fire against pro- Syrian government forces at the al-Mashad neighbourhood in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo on August 25, 2012. Syrian rebels say they are digging in for a war of attrition in Aleppo, where what was being billed as the ‘mother of all battles’ is now dragging on into a second month of bloody stalemate. Getty

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A woman walks with her children as a blue sheet provides cover from snipers during sectarian clashes between Sunni Muslims and Alawites in the Sunni area of Tripoli August 25, 2012. At least three people including an Sunni Islamist commander were killed on Friday in a fifth day of sporadic sectarian fighting in Lebanon’s northern city of Tripoli triggered by the conflict in neighbouring Syria. Reuters

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Young Syrian boys search through the ruins of destroyed houses following an airstrike by regime forces in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo on August 24, 2012. Syrian forces blitzed areas in and around the Aleppo, activists said, as Western powers sought to tighten the screws on embattled President Bashar al-Assad. Getty

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A Syrian man reacts outside an operation room at a hospital in Syria’s northern city of Aleppo as doctors give treatment to his grandchildren following an air strike by regime forces on the city on August 24, 2012. Syrian forces blitzed areas in and around the Aleppo , activists said, as Western powers sought to tighten the screws on embattled President Bashar al-Assad. Getty

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Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad (R) shakes hands with Alaeddin Boroujerdi, head of the Iranian parliamentary committee for national security and foreign policy, before a meeting in Damascus August 26, 2012, in this handout photograph released by Syria’s national news agency SANA. Reuters

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Syrian Vice President Faruq al-Sharaa (R) is pictured with the chairman of the Iranian Shura Council’s Committee for Foreign Policy and National Security Alaeddin Boroujerd who is on an official visit to Damascus on August 26, 2012. Al-Sharaa made his first public appearance in over a month following rumors that he had tried to defect. Getty

TOP-SECRET – Developing Self-Sustaining Security Force Capabilities

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The Multi-National Corps–Iraq logistics staff and the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) support operations cell, an element of the Iraqi Assistance Group, merged at the operational level to publish plans, policies, and procedures that met the strategic aims of the coalition forces, the national goals of the government of Iraq, and the joint campaign plan published by Multi-National Force–Iraq. Corps sustainment planners published operational objectives for execution at the operational and tactical levels in an effort to develop a sustainment-based system for the ISF. Based on experiences and observations over the past 18 months, the partners, advisors, and planners gathered the best practices for advising and assisting security forces at all levels of the sustainment system. This handbook presents partnering considerations in developing a fundamental base for a self-sustaining, host nation security force.

Although based largely on the experiences of units deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from 2007–2009, the sustainment development ideas and concepts presented in this book are worthy of consideration by any leader assigned the challenging task of developing host nation logistics. This publication is not just for logisticians. All leaders are charged to sustain the force, and many of the lessons learned over the past two years highlight gaps at the collective task/green-tab leader level. Many of the leaders in the Iraqi Army; Iraqi Police; National Police; Department of Border Security; Ministers of Defense, Interior, Transportation, Health, Oil; and many others, including coalition partners were themselves challenged by force sustainment and are critical elements to the solution.

Key Concepts

• Commanders must avoid providing direct support to host nation security forces—if a system exists—and instead provide recommendations supporting the development of a host nation sustainment culture.
• Host nation logistics development requires organizations to assess processes outside their level of war to determine friction points.
• Leaders must recognize the importance of moving from initial assessment and continuing the planning process and plan implementation.
• Development of a process to synchronize efforts across all headquarters to gain unity of effort without unity of command is key to developing host nation systems.
• Systematic problems should be solved rather than symptomatic problems.
• Development of sustainment capabilities for local security forces is essential to establishing a viable local security structure.

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