Category Archives: BERND PULCH

Charlie Chaplin: Pay Day – Full Movie

 

Charlie is an expert bricklayer. He has lots of fun and work and enjoys himself greatly while at the saloon. As he leaves work his wife takes the pay he has hidden in his hat. But he steals her purse so he can go out for the evening. He has a terrible time getting home on a very rainy night. When he does so he finds his wife waiting for him with a rolling pin.

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Unveiled – Women Protest Worldwide Mayday 2012

Women Protest Worldwide Mayday 2012

[Image]A demonstrator grimaces after she was pepper sprayed by Israeli troops during a protest calling for the release prisoners jailed in Israel outside the Ofer military prison, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, Tuesday May 1, 2012. (Majdi Mohammed)

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[Image]A female protester associated with the Occupy Wall Street movement is arrested while marching through traffic in lower Manhattan on May 1, 2012 in New York City. May 1st, Labor Day, is a traditional day of global protest in sympathy with union and leftist politics. Getty

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[Image]An Occupy demonstrator confronts a police officer during rally in the streets as part of a nation-wide May Day protest in Oakland, California May 1, 2012. Reuters
[Image]An Israeli soldier restrains a Palestinian protester, grimacing after being hit by ‘skunk’ liquid after she was forced down from atop an Israeli military vehicle where she stood waving her national flag, during a protest by some 300 people outside Ofer military prison near the West Bank city of Ramallah on May 1, 2012 in a show of support for prisoners held in Israeli jails. Clashes erupted between stone-throwing youths and the Israeli army, who fired tear gas, rubber bullets and a foul-smelling liquid known as ‘skunk’ to break up the demonstration. Getty

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[Image]Members of Occupy DC and union activists chant slogans in front of the White House during a May Day protest in Washington on May 1, 2012. More than 20 arrests were reported in various cities, including 10 at Los Angeles international airport and others in Oakland and Seattle, where shop windows were smashed. Getty
[Image]Protesters associated with the Occupy Wall Street movement march through traffic in lower Manhattan on May 1, 2012 in New York City. May 1st, Labor Day, is a traditional day of global protest in sympathy with union and leftist politics. Getty
[Image]Riot police charge during clashes between police and mostly left-wing protesters in the May Day demonstrations on May 1, 2012 in Hamburg, Germany. May 1st, also known as Labor Day, is a traditional day of global protest in sympathy with union and leftist politics. Getty
[Image]Indian laborers shots slogans during a rally to mark May Day in Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, May 1, 2012. Placards in Gujarati read, ” strictly enforce all labor laws in the state”, bottom left and ” Pay Rupees 500 as monthly allowance to workers of the non-organized sector”, bottom right. (Ajit Solanki)
[Image]Occupy Wall Street protesters picket during a May Day rally in front of the Bank of America buidling on May 1, 2012 in New York City. Demonstrators have called for nation-wide May Day strikes to protest economic inequality and political corruption. Getty
[Image]Bahraini Shiite Muslim women take part in a Labour Day pro-democracy protest in the Manama suburb of Sanabis on May 1, 2012. Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Shiite villages in Bahrain to demand being reinstated in jobs from which they were fired during last year’s uprising, witnesses said. Getty
[Image]A Bahraini anti-government protester runs from riot police dispersing a Labor Day demonstration in support of people fired from their jobs for political activity Tuesday, May 1, 2012, in Sitra, Bahrain, southeast of the capital of Manama. Also on Tuesday, a jailed Bahraini rights activist will not end his nearly three-months hunger strike despite a court-ordered review of his conviction and life sentence, his wife said, as sporadic clashes broke out around the Gulf kingdom. (Hasan Jamal)
[Image]Kashmiri Muslim woman workers of Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) shouts slogans against the government on May Day in Srinagar India, Tuesday, May 1, 2012. May Day moved beyond its roots as an international workers’ holiday to a day of international protest Tuesday, with rallies throughout Asia demanding wage increases and marches planned across Europe over government-imposed austerity measures. AP
[Image]Students and workers carry red flags during a May Day protest in central Athens May 1, 2012. Thousands of workers across southern Europe protested against spending cuts in annual May Day rallies on Tuesday, before weekend elections in Greece and France where voters are expected to punish leaders for austerity. Reuters
[Image]In this photograph taken by AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, National Guestworkers Alliance, Act Up Philadelphia and Metropolitan Community Church of Philadelphia protest outside of the Hershey’s annual shareholder meeting on Tuesday, May 1, 2012, in Hershey, Penn. AP
[Image]Cambodian protesters chain their hands as they block the road in front of Cambodia’s National Assembly in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Tuesday, May 1, 2012. The demonstrators on Tuesday began what they said would be a week-long protest to pressure the government for the titles. They said they were residents of Phnom Penh’s Boueng Kak lake area whose land was awarded by the government to a Chinese company to be redeveloped commercially. AP
[Image]A Bangladeshi veiled woman participates in a march to celebrate May Day in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Tuesday, May 1, 2012. May Day moved beyond its roots as an international workers’ holiday to a day of international protest Tuesday, with rallies throughout Asia demanding wage increases and marches planned across Europe over government-imposed austerity measures. AP
[Image]Supporters of the Lebanese Communist party, wave Lebanese flags with the Communist sign printed on them and chant slogans against the Lebanese government, during a demonstration to mark Labor Day, in Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday, May 1, 2012. More than 3000 members of the Lebanese Communist party marched in Beirut Streets to mark May Day, using the occasion to protest the worsening economic conditions in the country. (Bilal Hussein)
[Image]Protesters block traffic on 42nd Street and 6th Avenue, Tuesday, May 1, 2012 in New York. Hundreds of activists with a variety of causes spread out over New York City Tuesday on International Workers Day, or May Day, with Occupy Wall Street members leading a charge against financial institutions. (Mary Altaffer)
[Image]A coalition of activists join Occupy Wall Street in a May Day march from Bryant Park on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 in New York. Hundreds of activists with a variety of causes spread out over New York City on International Workers Day, or May Day, with Occupy Wall Street members leading a charge against financial institutions. (Bebeto Matthews)
[Image]May Day moved beyond its roots as an international workers’ holiday to a day of international protest Tuesday, with rallies throughout Asia demanding wage increases and marches planned across Europe over government-imposed austerity measures.Thousands of workers protested in the Philippines, Indonesia and Taiwan and other Asian nations, with the demand for wage hikes amid soaring oil prices a common theme.
[Image]A protester is arrested during a May Day march and protest in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, May 1, 2012. Hundreds of activists across the U.S. joined the worldwide May Day protests on Tuesday, with Occupy Wall Street members in several cities leading demonstrations and in some cases clashing with police. (Don Ryan)
[Image]A demonstrator, who wished not to give her name, stands in front of the Georgia Capitol for a May Day immigration rally Tuesday, May 1, 2012, in Atlanta. The May Day rally at the Capitol Tuesday that organizers called a “historic coming together” of immigrants and working people was significantly smaller than in recent years, drawing only about 100 people. (David Goldman)
[Image]Protesters march through the streets, Tuesday, May 1, 2012 in New York. Hundreds of activists with a variety of causes spread out over New York City Tuesday on International Workers Day, or May Day, with Occupy Wall Street members leading a charge against financial institutions. (Mary Altaffer)

 


	

Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon – Full Movie

Starting in Switzerland, Sherlock Holmes rescues the inventor of a bomb-sight which the allies want to keep from the Nazis

The second of Universal’s “modernized” Sherlock Holmes films pits the Great Detective (Basil Rathbone, of course) against that “Napoleon of Crime,” Professor Moriarty (Lionel Atwill). Surpassing his previous skullduggery, Moriarty has now aligned himself with the Nazis and has dedicated himself to stealing a top-secret bomb sight developed by expatriate European scientist Dr. Franz Tobel (William Post Jr.). Before being kidnapped by Moriarty’s minions, Tobel was enterprising enough to disassemble his invention and distribute its components among several other patriotic scientists. Racing against the clock, Holmes and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) try to stem the murders of Tobel’s colleagues and prevent Moriarty from getting his mitts on the precious secret weapon. The now-famous climax finds Holmes playing for time by allowing Moriarty to drain all the blood from his body, drop by drop (“The needle to the last, eh Holmes?” gloats the villain). Dennis Hoey makes his first appearance as the dull-witted, conclusion-jumping Inspector Lestrade. Constructed more like a serial than a feature film, Sherlock Holmes and the Secret Weapon (based loosely on Conan Doyle’s The Dancing Men) is one of the fastest-moving entries in the series; it is also one of the most readily accessible, having lapsed into public domain in 1969.

TOP-SECRET – Suspicious Activity Reporting Line Officer Training Video

 

A video created by the Bureau of Justice Assistance to train line officers on what to look for and how to report suspicious activity. For a full transcript of the video, see:

http://publicintelligence.net/sar-training-video/

The video was made by the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the International Association of Chiefs of Police.  It is designed to inform law enforcement “line officers” of standards for reporting suspicious activity in furtherance of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI).  The video and transcript were obtained from the website of the Department of Public Safety in New Mexico.  Interestingly, the transcript includes multiple paragraphs at the end referring to the role of fusion centers and the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the suspicious activity reporting cycle that are not mentioned in the video.

SAR Line Officer Training Transcript

Suspicious Activity Reporting—Line Officer Training

This training is designed to:

  • Increase your awareness of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting or (SAR) Initiative (NSI).
  • Enhance your understanding of the behaviors associated with pre-incident terrorism activities.
  • Convey the significance of your role in documenting and reporting suspicious activity.
  • Emphasize the importance of protecting privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties as you document and share information.

You are the nation’s strongest force in the fight against terrorism. As a frontline law enforcement officer, you are trained to recognize behaviors and activities that are suspicious, and your daily duties position you to observe and report these suspicious behaviors and activities.

Like other criminals, terrorists engage in precursor actions to carry out their plot for destruction. They make plans, acquire materials, engage in intelligence collection, and often commit other criminal activities in support of their plan. These actions produce activities or behaviors that may be suspicious, indicators of what may lie ahead, or possible pieces to a larger puzzle. By identifying, documenting, and sharing information regarding suspicious behaviors and activities that have a potential terrorism nexus, we will all be better prepared to prevent future terrorist attacks in our communities.

The NSI establishes a capacity for sharing terrorism and related criminal activity SARs. The SAR process focuses on what law enforcement has been doing for years—gathering, documenting, processing, analyzing, and sharing information regarding suspicious activity. The NSI is designed to share and analyze the information you observe and report each day with other information gathered across the nation in an effort to detect and disrupt terrorist activity.

How do you identify terrorism behavior? Anyone can be a terrorist. The key is NOT to focus on Who—the race, ethnicity, gender, or religious beliefs of those we think might be involved in suspicious activities—but rather to focus on identifying the behaviors. When observing behaviors, officers need to take into account the totality of circumstances—such as What, Where, When, and How.

SARs focus on observed behaviors and incidents reasonably indicative of preoperational planning related to terrorism or other criminal activity. These activities are suspicious based upon:

  • What—the observable behaviors
  • Where—the location of specific activities
  • When—the timelines of events
  • How—the tools and methods

Previous terrorism events have been reviewed and analyzed for commonalities. The result is a compilation of indicators and behaviors that were present in previous terrorist events. Although these behaviors do not mean that someone is definitely engaged in criminal or terrorist activity, they do provide justification for further analysis. The following types of suspicious activity are examples of potential terrorism-related behaviors that should be documented when observed.

  • Breach or attempted intrusion of a restricted area by unauthorized persons, such as using false credentials to access government buildings or military installations.
  • Misrepresentation or presentation of false documents or identification to cover illicit activity, such as stolen or counterfeit identification or fraudulent warrants, subpoenas, or liens.
  • Theft, loss, or diversion of materials associated with a facility or structure, such as stolen badges, uniforms, or emergency vehicles that are proprietary to a facility.
  • Sabotage, tampering, or vandalism of a facility or protected site, such as arson or damage committed at a research or industrial facility.
  • Expressed or implied threat to damage or compromise a facility or structure, such as written or verbal threats against individuals, groups, or targets.
  • Eliciting information beyond curiosity about a facility’s or building’s purpose, operations, or security, such as attempts to obtain specific information about personnel or occupants, equipment, or training related to the security of a facility.
  • Testing or probing of security to reveal physical, personnel, or cyber security capabilities, such as repeated false alarms intended to test law enforcement response time and rehearse procedures.
  • Material acquisition or storage of unusual quantities of materials, such as weapons, cell phones, pagers, fuel, chemicals, toxic materials, and timers.
  • Photography, observation, or surveillance of facilities, buildings, or critical infrastructure and key resources beyond casual, tourism, or artistic interest, to include facility access points, staff or occupants, or security measures.

Photography and other similar activities are protected activities unless connected to other suspicious activities that would indicate potential terrorism. This may cause the officer to conduct additional observation or gather additional information—again taking into account the totality of circumstances.

Protecting the privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties of Americans is critical to preserving our democratic principles and to building trust between law enforcement and the people we serve. Only by building trust will we achieve a level of citizen cooperation with law enforcement that will maximize our ability to keep our communities and our nation safe and secure from crime and terrorism.

As you document and report these or other types of suspicious activity, protection of privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties is paramount. Just as you do in your other daily law enforcement duties, you must:

  • Collect information in a lawful manner.
  • Protect the rights of the individual.
  • Avoid collecting information protected by the Bill of Rights.
  • Ensure information is as accurate as possible.

Profiling of individuals based on their race, color, national origin, or religion is not acceptable in reporting terrorism-related suspicious activity, just as it is not acceptable in other law enforcement actions. Remember, First Amendment rights to free speech, religion, assembly, and so forth ensure that people can express their beliefs and take other protected actions without government intrusion. Protection of privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties is a fundamental principle that underlies the Nationwide SAR Initiative.

The Nationwide SAR Cycle starts with you and depends on involvement from all levels of law enforcement to ensure that information gathered on the street reaches all appropriate stakeholders.
Every state and many major metropolitan areas have developed intelligence fusion centers to make sure that terrorism and other criminal information is analyzed and forwarded to the appropriate jurisdiction for follow-up investigation.

When you collect and document suspicious activity information, that information is routed to your supervisor and others for evaluation in accordance with your departmental policy. SAR information is then entered into a local, regional, state, or federal system and submitted to a fusion center for review by a trained analyst or investigator. The reviewer determines whether the information has a nexus to terrorism and meets the criteria for sharing nationwide. If so, it is forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) for investigative follow-up.

The Birth of a Nation – D.W. Griffith – Full Movie

Two brothers, Phil and Ted Stoneman, visit their friends in Piedmont, South Carolina: the family Cameron. This friendship is affected by the Civil War, as the Stonemans and the Camerons must join up opposite armies. The consequences of the War in their lives are shown in connection to major historical events, like the development of the Civil War itself, Lincoln’s assassination, and the birth of the Ku Klux Klan.

The most successful and artistically advanced film of its time, The Birth of a Nation has also sparked protests, riots, and divisiveness since its first release. The film tells the story of the Civil War and its aftermath, as seen through the eyes of two families. The Stonemans hail from the North, the Camerons from the South. When war breaks out, the Stonemans cast their lot with the Union, while the Camerons are loyal to Dixie. After the war, Ben Cameron (Henry B. Walthall), distressed that his beloved south is now under the rule of blacks and carpetbaggers, organizes several like-minded Southerners into a secret vigilante group called the Ku Klux Klan. When Cameron’s beloved younger sister Flora (Mae Marsh) leaps to her death rather than surrender to the lustful advances of renegade slave Gus (Walter Long), the Klan wages war on the new Northern-inspired government and ultimately restores “order” to the South. In the original prints, Griffith suggested that the black population be shipped to Liberia, citing Abraham Lincoln as the inspiration for this ethnic cleansing. Showings of Birth of a Nation were picketed and boycotted from the start, and as recently as 1995, Turner Classic Movies cancelled a showing of a restored print in the wake of the racial tensions around the O.J. Simpson trial verdict.